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Old 04-07-2014, 12:49 PM   #1
JonBrew
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Default White Labs 002 (English Ale) in an IPA?

Hi all,

Looking for some advice on whether or not to use WL002 in an IPA style. My concerns is that the description of the yeast states that it "mutes hop character". Obviously the hop character is important in an IPA. I'm wondering if the yeast will only effect hop character during fermentation, i.e. can I still use it and then just dry hop to provide hop aroma after primary fermentation?

The style guide on the White Labs website suggests that this yeast would be fine for an IPA but seems like a contradiction.

Any got any ideas?

Many thanks

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Old 04-07-2014, 12:51 PM   #2
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I used that in an IPA. I think the reason that it supposedly mutes hop character is due to the high flocculation. Still for me it turned out really good. You could always increase the late hops if you wanted to be sure of good hop aroma.


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Old 04-07-2014, 01:48 PM   #3
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Thanks Yooper.

Sorry, I'm a bit of a noob so, could you explain how high floccuation would affect the hops?

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Old 04-07-2014, 01:57 PM   #4
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The idea is that yeast in suspension would "pull out" the hops oils as it flocculates and so a highly flocculant yeast strain could mute hops flavor and aroma.


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Old 04-07-2014, 02:25 PM   #5
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Thanks Yooper, that makes sense. Sounds like dry hoping would work nicely then once fermentation is more or less complete and the yeast has floccuated.

Thanks again!

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Old 04-07-2014, 07:14 PM   #6
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I've used WLP002/WY1968 many, many times in IPA and other hoppy beers. It is an outstanding all around yeast. I would probably prefer not to use it in a west coast style IPA. The yeast does leave a bit of residual maltiness, which I think is fine in an east coast/Colorado style IPA.


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Old 04-07-2014, 07:35 PM   #7
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An English yeast like that will leave esters which are found in English IPA's. i.e. Sammy Smiths etc. You can taste a little fruitiness in the malt flavor. The IPA's hops drown some of that out but you can really taste it in an English Pale Ale.

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Old 04-07-2014, 08:15 PM   #8
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i've had some good success with it (great for session IPAs), but more importantly it works just fine for deschutes, lagunitas, firestone walker, etc in their IPAs

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Old 04-07-2014, 09:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcp27 View Post
i've had some good success with it (great for session IPAs), but more importantly it works just fine for deschutes, lagunitas, firestone walker, etc in their IPAs
Those quality breweries were the reason I just started to use this yeast. I believe Firestone uses the WLP002 in almost all of their beers and I don't think anyone could call their IPAs weak in the hops department. I finished a black IPA about a month ago using the WLP002 for the first time. Great overall bitterness as well as hop aroma and flavor. I think if you are going to use it in an IPA three things to remember are to:

1) Slightly overpitch (due to factor two)
2) Ferment cool to minimize diacetyl
3) Dry hop once the yeast has started to floc out.

You'll be good to go.
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Old 04-07-2014, 10:01 PM   #10
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I've used it a couple of times and it made good beer. My experience with WLP002 is that it doesn't attenuate quite as well as WLP001 (usually around 75% for me). You probably won't end up with quite as dry/clean beer, but there's something to be said for character and I think WLP002 has it in spades.

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