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Old 09-28-2011, 06:31 PM   #1
JeffStewart
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Default Washing WLP007

Washed a yeast cake of WLP007 Dry English Ale but because the yeast flocc'd so much (clumpy yeast) washed it several times and kept the stuff on the bottom. I've pitched into a starter on a stir plate and my question is, is there anyways to separate some more of the trub out before pitching into the next batch?

Thanks in advance.

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Old 09-28-2011, 06:37 PM   #2
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The amount of trub thats going to be left after multiple washing will be a small drop into a huge bucket (literally). It wont affect the taste of your beer.

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Old 09-28-2011, 06:41 PM   #3
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had the same problem, seems like hard strain to wash in general

i saved a bunch of trub with the yeast and pitched it in a couple different beers with no noticeable off tastes - just much harder to estimate how much actual yeast you have

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Old 09-28-2011, 06:41 PM   #4
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I seem to recall someone mentioning that the wait time for settling during washing using highly flocculent yeast was much shorter something like 5 minutes instead of the usual thirty.

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Old 09-28-2011, 07:33 PM   #5
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Oh, ok. I try a shorter wait next time. Thanks for the help.

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Old 09-28-2011, 09:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockfish42 View Post
I seem to recall someone mentioning that the wait time for settling during washing using highly flocculent yeast was much shorter something like 5 minutes instead of the usual thirty.
Or < 30 seconds for something like WLP002.

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Old 09-28-2011, 11:28 PM   #7
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I just washed this yeast this week from a Northern English Brown, and tried a new washing approach due to the high flocculation. Trying this new technique was also motivated by my not having a big enough jar on hand, and washing from a bucket primary.

First, I added a gallon of water to my primary bucket and swirled it up, as normal. After letting it settle a bit, I carefully poured the slurry through a sanitized funnel into a gallon jug, and covered it with sanitized foil. After about 10 minutes, this was the result:



You can see that even though the trub is still settling out, the yeast are already sinking away from the surface. I then took a sanitized turkey baster and carefully started to suck up the yeast layer, depositing it into a sanitized growler. I ended up with about a quart and a half of slurry, which I presume is nearly pure yeast. I'll admit that it's not the most sanitation-paranoid way to do it, but it seemed to work. I was left with a good inch and a quarter of very solid yeast in the growler.

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Old 09-28-2011, 11:55 PM   #8
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I might have to try that. I ended up with probably 50% trub, 50% yeast. At least I hope it wasn't any worse than that.

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Old 09-12-2012, 02:49 PM   #9
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In the photo above, is the "white" layer, the yeast ?
If so, why not decant as usual ?

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Old 09-12-2012, 04:56 PM   #10
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This, among other reasons, is why I grow my yeast cleanly and divide instead of washing

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