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Old 01-18-2012, 01:59 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
And Fermentis has never had any of their yeasts recalled have they?
(I personally think Notty sucks.)
They should have recalled the recent bad lot of US-05 they put out. I know a few people whose beers stalled above 1.020 because of it. There is a thread about a bad lot here.
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Old 01-18-2012, 02:03 AM   #42
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Just out of curiosity, why wouldn't a person aerate their wort? Just one extra little step to ensure (for me) a good faster fermentation.
The same reason why you wouldn't recite the national anthem every morning before you get out of bed...you don't have to. Sure you COULD do it, but WHY do it if it's not necessary.

I get why you might want to do it, but I've found it's only necessary with liquid yeasts personally.
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Old 01-18-2012, 04:13 AM   #43
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These kind of debates bring up an interesting notion. Scientists have nailed down the multitude of reactions and processes and the components that are required, as well as the proper ratios for successful reactions.

Brewers have been making beer long before they had any idea of why it was working, using a slew of methods that, in hindsight, are contrary to some of the science.

The other factor is that there are many simultaneous reactions, so you may be trying to hit a sweet spot (like mash temps) to get the right balance, instead of trying to optimize one single reaction.

I oxygenate, make starters, and I've had some tremendous fermentation lately. I also rarely use dry yeast, but that's just because I prefer liquid.

So many ways to brew. That's the most fun part about the hobby.

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Old 01-18-2012, 05:46 AM   #44
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Completely false? The only statement that's completely false is that you're a paid member who values this site enough to fork over some cash for a membership.

You CAN, but don't NEED to aerate when using dry yeast. I've done it both ways and it makes no difference that I can perceive.
oh please, bud. my being a non paying member has nothing to do with my statements. stick to the topic.
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Old 01-18-2012, 06:08 AM   #45
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There are competing theories about yeast performance regarding areation from highly informed professionals who manufacture the stuff. Why is everyone arguing this? Let the yeast PhDs settle this before you become invested in either side...in the meantime humbly practice what you believe...

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Old 01-18-2012, 06:18 AM   #46
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I aerate my wort, wine and balloons and no one here can convince me to change!

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Old 01-18-2012, 06:24 AM   #47
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I could care less if anyone aerates with dry yeast or not. I'm not wasting oxygen on it when it's expensive, and have NEVER had a suck fermentation (or high fg) with just rehydrating, including a lot of high gravity beers.

The problem I have is people preaching it as gospel, and telling new brewers it's absolutely why they have a stuck fermentation. That's garbage advice.

I also don't leave my beer in the fermenter for a month either, so there.

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Old 01-18-2012, 06:28 AM   #48
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i guess my question is still, if we advocate aerating with liquid yeast, but not with dry...why? they are both yeast. there's no "real" difference in the way that they work, so is aeration itself not necessary or is there some fundamental difference that i'm missing?

honest question.

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Old 01-18-2012, 06:41 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by MrManifesto View Post
i guess my question is still, if we advocate aerating with liquid yeast, but not with dry...why? they are both yeast. there's no "real" difference in the way that they work, so is aeration itself not necessary or is there some fundamental difference that i'm missing?

honest question.
It's been posted in this thread as well as many other threads, I've even done so myself.

During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation.

Liquid yeast doesn't get this leg up on fermentation so it needs more Oxygen to accomplish this task.
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Old 01-18-2012, 06:46 AM   #50
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It's been posted in this thread as well as many other threads, I've even done so myself.

During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation.

Liquid yeast doesn't get this leg up on fermentation so it needs more Oxygen to accomplish this task.
but...how? what is the advantage that dry yeast has in this regard that liquid doesn't?
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