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Old 02-04-2013, 01:16 PM   #11
GinSlinger
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Thanks Calder, I missed the sugar.

JCrazy, it seems you and I are talking about two different things when it comes to efficiency. I think most people here use that word to refer to the efficiency of their mash/sparge/boil. In which case, we're interested in how much of the potential sugars we extracted from the grains we use.

Not all of the sugars we extract are fermentable, just like in your DME. Still, you extracted 100% of those sugars, and so they whould be included in your theoretical OG. They're there, and affecting your hydrometer, even if they're not going to ferment. And there's a pretty big difference between 1.125 and 1.152.

Using 152, and 1.016 as a desired FG (the upper bound for the style), you're seeking roughly 90% attenuation, which will give you an ABV of circa 18%. If, instead, we use your hypothetical OG, and again using 1.016 as a desired FG (87% AA), the finished beer ends up around 14%. There's a whole session beer in the difference there.

WLP099 and a lot of time may get you closer to a decent FG. I understand some people use Turbo yeast for high gravity work. You may also think about playing around with a water dilution. I've never done anything near this high gravity, but I've got to expect whatever solution will get this lower is going to require many, many months. Good luck.



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Old 02-07-2013, 01:56 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by JCrazy84 View Post
DME is only about 75%-80% fermentable under normal circumstances. Briess describes on its own website that it is typically 75% fermentable.
I just want to re-emphasise what GinSlinger said. The DME is not 100% fermentable, but 100% of the sugars went into your beer.

75% fermentable means that under some 'standard conditions', a wort of say 1.100 OG will end somewhere around 1.025, or 75% attenuation. You will get more or less apparent attenuation depending on the yeast you use and what other ingredients you used.

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Thanks for the helpful links! I read them all, and they were rather informative! I know what I can do to help myself next time, and if I ever wanted to make 120, I could! (But, I need to get to another state, damn 12% max laws in Ohio...)
You had better leave he state, because you are already well above that.


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Old 02-12-2013, 04:10 PM   #13
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Okay, so here is what I am thinking. Say it is 15% right now, if I got my best possible attenuation, and if I got to my best attenuation it would be 18%.

I have my blonde in bottles, still with the same yeast strain. What if I bottle harvest, build up, and make another blonde and blend. Make the blonde with 5# Belg Pils, .25# Flaked Wheat and 2# of dextrose, mashed at 145. That would give me an OG of 1.045ish, and an FG in the neighborhood of 1.009 or so (80%AA). So, after fermenting for two weeks, I could take 2.5 gal of quad, and 2.5 of blonde, and put it in two secondaries, while rubbing the cane on the yeast layer a bit.

Assuming that I still have 16 points or so to drop in the quad, that would be the secondaries have a 8 points to drop each. So, the blend would go in at 1.023 or so, (assuming the 1.009FG of the Blonde), and can get down the 8 points to 1.015 over the course of time. The Blonde would be 4.8% or so, and say I am at 15% right now with the quad, so it would go in at ~10%, and drop another percent or so if the presumed unfermented 8 points drop down in each one, and I would end up with a blend of two ~11% beers. The color shouldn't matter too much, as the 2# of Candi Sugar should keep it in the 18-22 range.

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Old 02-15-2013, 12:45 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by JCrazy84 View Post
Okay, so here is what I am thinking. Say it is 15% right now, if I got my best possible attenuation, and if I got to my best attenuation it would be 18%.

I have my blonde in bottles, still with the same yeast strain. What if I bottle harvest, build up, and make another blonde and blend. Make the blonde with 5# Belg Pils, .25# Flaked Wheat and 2# of dextrose, mashed at 145. That would give me an OG of 1.045ish, and an FG in the neighborhood of 1.009 or so (80%AA). So, after fermenting for two weeks, I could take 2.5 gal of quad, and 2.5 of blonde, and put it in two secondaries, while rubbing the cane on the yeast layer a bit.

Assuming that I still have 16 points or so to drop in the quad, that would be the secondaries have a 8 points to drop each. So, the blend would go in at 1.023 or so, (assuming the 1.009FG of the Blonde), and can get down the 8 points to 1.015 over the course of time. The Blonde would be 4.8% or so, and say I am at 15% right now with the quad, so it would go in at ~10%, and drop another percent or so if the presumed unfermented 8 points drop down in each one, and I would end up with a blend of two ~11% beers. The color shouldn't matter too much, as the 2# of Candi Sugar should keep it in the 18-22 range.
Not exactly sure what you are asking. A little confusing.

You probably don't have to make up any more yeast. Split the beer you have into 2 new fermenters. Then pour out he cake and split it into 2. Brew a second beer to about 1.050 and split it between the two fermenters and then add back half the yeast cake to each 'new' batch. I would not aerate at this point; you will probably splash some into it, but don't worry.

This would then give you 2 beers with an effective OG of 1.100.

An alternate could be to add a half batch of 2 different beers to each 'new' fermenter and end up with 2 different beers.
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:17 PM   #15
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I wasn't really asking anything, just merely stating my plan of attack.

The only problem with doing the split from the get go, is that since I do PM's and not full boils, I have to dilute to 5gal in the fermenter, as I only end up with 3.25-3.5 gal of final boil volume. I could never get a homogeneous mixture of the new beer into the old beer without sufficient aeration, aeration which could cause issues in the final product. Same goes for if I estimate how much I have left, and then add the top off tap water with oxygen dissolved within it and throw the blonde in like that.

I could do 2 "full" half batches, but I don't have the time this week to brew twice, and I don't see that time happening in the near future, but I can brew once this weekend, so it will happen the way I described above, for better or worse.

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Old 12-15-2013, 07:36 PM   #16
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Not to high-jack and older thread but I've got what I think is a verrry slow ferm...I think. My dark strong went from 1.096 down to 1.032 in the three weeks it's been in primary. I was still getting a bubble out of the the airlock every 10-15 seconds at 69*F. I transferred to secondary and am now getting the same bubble times. I used WLP530 as I have before in my tripels but didn't start with a gravity this high. I'm thinking I can up the temp and see what happens.

Originally in day two I had massive blowout in my fermentation chamber and cleaned a yeast cake off of the bottom of the chamber. Maybe it spewed out too much good yeast.



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