Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Starter boil-off, SG sample

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-24-2012, 11:55 AM   #1
anbowden
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Blue Ridge, VA
Posts: 43
Likes Given: 1

Default Starter boil-off, SG sample

I made my first starter yesterday and I noticed that my original 1L water + 1 cup DME mixture had reduced in volume after the 10 minute boil down to approx. 900 mL. Is it important to start with the correct water-DME ratio or finish with the correct ratio(use more water next time)?
I've read on the forum that people have taken SG readings of their starter. Do you purposely make your starter a little bigger than you need so you can pull ~150 mL for your SG measurement? Or do you sanitize your SG equipment and then dump the wort back into the batch?

Thanks,
Andy

__________________
anbowden is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 12:15 PM   #2
MalFet
/bɪər nərd/
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
MalFet's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NYC / Kathmandu
Posts: 8,180
Liked 1218 Times on 806 Posts
Likes Given: 555

Default

You want to target your post volume boil, but +/- 10% won't really matter in a significant way.

Once you've made a couple, you'll probably lose interest in measuring your gravities. If you measure your DME and water correctly, you'll get the same gravity every time.

__________________

"Be excellent to each other." -Benjamin Franklin

MalFet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 01:07 PM   #3
anbowden
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Blue Ridge, VA
Posts: 43
Likes Given: 1

Default

Isn't it helpful to measure the final gravity to know when the starter is finished? Or am I over thinking this?

__________________
anbowden is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 01:22 PM   #4
MalFet
/bɪər nərd/
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
MalFet's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NYC / Kathmandu
Posts: 8,180
Liked 1218 Times on 806 Posts
Likes Given: 555

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by anbowden View Post
Isn't it helpful to measure the final gravity to know when the starter is finished? Or am I over thinking this?
It'll be done in 48 hours, probably less. Even if you cut it off a smidge early, your goal here is to grow yeast, not ferment beer. The bulk of the yeast growth happens before active fermentation even starts.

Starters get pretty rote. I do 100g of DME per 1000mL of water, use volumes as dicated by yeastcalc.com, and let the thing go 2 days on the stirplate and then 2 days in the fridge. Decant off the spent liquid and pitch on brewday.

__________________

"Be excellent to each other." -Benjamin Franklin

MalFet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-24-2012, 02:19 PM   #5
Sulli
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posts: 404
Liked 34 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Don't boil it for so long. I let my starters reach boiling then kill the heat, once it reaches the boiling point everything is dead anyway. Check out this link

__________________
Sulli is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 06:58 PM   #6
anbowden
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Blue Ridge, VA
Posts: 43
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MalFet View Post
It'll be done in 48 hours, probably less. Even if you cut it off a smidge early, your goal here is to grow yeast, not ferment beer. The bulk of the yeast growth happens before active fermentation even starts.

Starters get pretty rote. I do 100g of DME per 1000mL of water, use volumes as dicated by yeastcalc.com, and let the thing go 2 days on the stirplate and then 2 days in the fridge. Decant off the spent liquid and pitch on brewday.

I've read elsewhere that starters are done in 12-24 hours. How do you know when your starter is done? Is there any danger in letting to go too long? Eventually the yeast run out of "food" to eat, right?

Thanks,
Andy
__________________
anbowden is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-25-2012, 07:01 PM   #7
MalFet
/bɪər nərd/
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
MalFet's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: NYC / Kathmandu
Posts: 8,180
Liked 1218 Times on 806 Posts
Likes Given: 555

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by anbowden View Post
I've read elsewhere that starters are done in 12-24 hours. How do you know when your starter is done? Is there any danger in letting to go too long? Eventually the yeast run out of "food" to eat, right?

Thanks,
Andy
No real danger, except for contamination I suppose. 12h sounds plausible too. Chris White says 48h on plate and 48h in fridge, so that's what I do.
__________________

"Be excellent to each other." -Benjamin Franklin

MalFet is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I really need to boil my whole starter? Handsaw Fermentation & Yeast 15 10-14-2012 07:22 PM
No-boil starter? 2bluewagons Fermentation & Yeast 12 10-13-2012 12:58 PM
pre boil gravity hydro sample question t_stout All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 06-24-2012 05:03 AM
To sample or not to sample, this is my question! mgm1986 Fermentation & Yeast 0 02-08-2012 02:39 PM
Pulling a refractormeter sample during boil gungadin General Techniques 11 01-01-2011 03:06 AM