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Old 01-09-2013, 11:48 PM   #1
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Default Start at 60 raise to 70 ???

So I'll be brewing up my first Belain Tripel this weekend and the recipe states to start the fermentation at 60 raise to 70.

So I start the fermentation at 60 no problem, how soon am I supposed to start raising the temp and end with the 70??

As most know you can't determine the exact time a batch ferments and for how long. So for those of you that know WTF your doing when this type of ferm. temp needs to raise. Give me an idea as I can control the temp to do this but not sure if I do it over 3 days time or maybe 7.

Thanks for the advice in advance.....

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Old 01-10-2013, 12:04 AM   #2
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I do it with the help of a dedicated fermentation fridge. Although I don't start it at 60. I usually start around 66F or so. I set the fridge to 66F, and once the fermentation has begun and the temp starts to rise above 66F, it's usually been about 24 to 48 hours. After that, I take the carboys out of the fridge, and put them in a spot with an ambient temp of around 70-72F. The heat from the yeast metabolizing the sugars will take it from there. I let my abbey yeast strains get into the high 70's once the initial phase of avoiding fusels is complete.

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Old 01-10-2013, 02:53 AM   #3
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Watch the fermentation with this beer. It will tell you when to raise the temperature. As the fermentation starts to slow down, the krausen will start to fall, that is the time to add heat. Personally, with this style, ill ferment at 60 and not add any sugar in the boil. When fermentation begins to slow, Ill boil water with the sugar and add it straight to fermenter. With my experimentation, this raises my temp enough restarting fermentation carries temp until next addition.

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Old 01-10-2013, 03:11 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marc06 View Post
Watch the fermentation with this beer. It will tell you when to raise the temperature. As the fermentation starts to slow down, the krausen will start to fall, that is the time to add heat. Personally, with this style, ill ferment at 60 and not add any sugar in the boil. When fermentation begins to slow, Ill boil water with the sugar and add it straight to fermenter. With my experimentation, this raises my temp enough restarting fermentation carries temp until next addition.
To each, his own. I've tried this method with moderate success.

From my experience, and from what I've read, you only need to keep the temperature down during the first 24-48 hours to avoid fusel alcohols, then let the temp rise and welcome the those esters!

Keep in mind that if you want to know the alcohol content of the beer using marc's method, you'll have to take multiple gravity readings and add up the cumulative differences - for whatever that's worth.

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Secondary:
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Bottled:
About 36 gallons of beer & 4.2 gallons of mead
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Old 01-10-2013, 03:18 AM   #5
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There are a lot of differing views on this issue. I prefer to keep the temp down during the reproductive phase since that has such a profound effect on the rest of fermentation and let the yeast activity bring the temp up once the krausen starts to form. In my case, I can let it free rise up to the mid 70's. If I had to add heat, I'd probably add hot water to my water bath. Maybe add near boiling water in a plastic water bottle to a water bath.

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Old 01-10-2013, 11:36 AM   #6
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So what I"m reading is start it out low as suggested let it start fermenting, keep a close eye on it and as the fermentation starts to slow start raising the heat slowly and keep doing the same process until it's finally around 70 were it'll be left for a few weeks.

Thanks guys

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Old 01-10-2013, 01:05 PM   #7
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I'd slowly raise the temperature once the krausen forms. So during the bulk of fermentation, but after the lag and reproduction phases. Not when its almost finished. The point is to dry out the beer and add more phenolic and ester character. Raising the temp at the end will only help dry the beer.

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Old 01-10-2013, 09:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seabass07 View Post
I'd slowly raise the temperature once the krausen forms. So during the bulk of fermentation, but after the lag and reproduction phases. Not when its almost finished. The point is to dry out the beer and add more phenolic and ester character. Raising the temp at the end will only help dry the beer.
Ayup.
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Primary:
1. Ger Pils 2. Ger Pils 3. none 4. none 5. none 6. none
Secondary:
1. Brett Ale 2. none 3. none 4. none
Bottled:
About 36 gallons of beer & 4.2 gallons of mead
Kegged & conditioning:
Breakfast Stout x2, Belgian Dubbel, Chocolate Milk Stout, Oktoberfest (lagering), Pale Ale x2
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seabass07 View Post
I'd slowly raise the temperature once the krausen forms. So during the bulk of fermentation, but after the lag and reproduction phases. Not when its almost finished. The point is to dry out the beer and add more phenolic and ester character. Raising the temp at the end will only help dry the beer.
consider it d u n!!!
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Beer Primary - Butthead Belgian
Beer Secondary - Belgian Tripel

Bottled - Big Breakfast Stout - Belgian IPA - Butthead Belgian White - Redneck Red - Moose Drool - Dirty Dubbel

Mead Primary - Nuttin
Bottled - Strawberry Trainwreck - Orange Spice - Blueberry Trainwreck

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