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Old 02-18-2011, 12:47 PM   #11
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I would let it sit for at least a few more days and up to 10 more. You want to make sure that yeast clean up all the fermentation by-products and have time to drop out.
When would you rack over then? The kit says 4-5 days.
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Old 02-18-2011, 01:32 PM   #12
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Take the instructions and ignore the part about racking to secondary... LEAVE IT ON THE YEAST!!! Let it stay there for at least 2 weeks before you think about bottling it up... I would even ignore the part where it says when to do anything after you put it into primary.

Take another sample at 10 days, use the hydrometer on it and taste it again... Do it again at 12-13 days... Do it again at 14-15 days... Bet dollars to donuts that the yeasty flavor will be gone closer to two weeks. Leaving it on the yeast cake is a GOOD THING...

Kits are notorious for making it sound like you need to rack to secondary. Or, that the brew will be completely done in X days... Let the yeast work at it's own pace, doing what it needs to do to give you a really good brew.

I wish I had known about this site when I first started brewing. I can only imagine how much better my first two brews would have been... Don't get me wrong, they came out pretty damned good, but if I had used these methods, they would have been great.

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Old 02-18-2011, 02:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Take the instructions and ignore the part about racking to secondary... LEAVE IT ON THE YEAST!!! Let it stay there for at least 2 weeks before you think about bottling it up... I would even ignore the part where it says when to do anything after you put it into primary.

Take another sample at 10 days, use the hydrometer on it and taste it again... Do it again at 12-13 days... Do it again at 14-15 days... Bet dollars to donuts that the yeasty flavor will be gone closer to two weeks. Leaving it on the yeast cake is a GOOD THING...

Kits are notorious for making it sound like you need to rack to secondary. Or, that the brew will be completely done in X days... Let the yeast work at it's own pace, doing what it needs to do to give you a really good brew.

I second all that good advice.
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Old 02-18-2011, 02:14 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by MachineShopBrewing View Post
I second all that good advice.
+1 I agree as well...and if you absolutely wanna see a lot of activity your next batches do a search on yeast starters....ever since I started using them I have a lot of activity and fermentation starts quicker
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Old 02-18-2011, 02:15 PM   #15
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I got some kits and they said to do x in y number of days but either they forgot to tell the yeast the schedule or the yeast just ignored them and did their own thing. It's best to ignore the arbitrary schedules we humans come up with and let the yeast determine when they are done.

+1 to the post above, give it at least 2 weeks before you do anything more but stare at the fermenter and then get too busy with something so you don't have time to do anything with it for another week after that, then think about bottling. If you get too busy to bottle it then, give it another week. Trust me (us?) it will be just fine.

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Old 02-18-2011, 02:22 PM   #16
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So everyone agrees it needs to sit in the primary for a few more days. What are your thoughts on going to the secondary? Is it just one more place for it to get contaminated? I know what the benefits are supposed to be, but this is my first batch. And even though my gravity is where the kit said I should end up at, should I still let it sit in the primary? I guess the fact that to get rid of the yeasty taste I need to leave it on the yeast for longer is counterintuitive and is screwing with me a bit.

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Old 02-18-2011, 02:24 PM   #17
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+2 on using starters... They're like a handful of Viagra for yeast...

When you do use a starter, be sure to have a blow-off tube setup either ready, or installed. The one time I didn't do that, I had foam blow through the airlock (6 gallon carboy too)...

Airlock right after I pulled it off the carboy... This was 6-7 hours after pitching the yeast.


Fermentation was like this for about 3-4 days, before it calmed down...


I've been using washed/rinsed yeast of late. I still use a starter (need to make sure everyone's happy) and get nice steady fermentation speeds. Usually visible fermentation for 7-10 days, then they calm down... Letting them ride for 3-4 weeks has produced really great brews.

One of the important things, is temperature control for your wort. Get it into the yeasts "happy place" for what you want in the brew (more or less esters, citrus notes, etc.) and hold it there during fermentation... Being able to hold the temperature in the desired range is just one more step on the road to stellar brews...

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Old 02-18-2011, 02:30 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by 18EBrew View Post
So everyone agrees it needs to sit in the primary for a few more days. What are your thoughts on going to the secondary? Is it just one more place for it to get contaminated? I know what the benefits are supposed to be, but this is my first batch. And even though my gravity is where the kit said I should end up at, should I still let it sit in the primary? I guess the fact that to get rid of the yeasty taste I need to leave it on the yeast for longer is counterintuitive and is screwing with me a bit.
NO SECONDARY for brews without multiple flavor additions post fermentation...

Go 2-4 weeks on the yeast.

If you look through the threads you'll see this said about a trillion times already... Typically, people that finally go this route see the light and realize how they've not been getting as good a brew as they could have...
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Old 02-18-2011, 04:45 PM   #19
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Quote:
I guess the fact that to get rid of the yeasty taste I need to leave it on the yeast for longer is counterintuitive and is screwing with me a bit.
The yeasty taste is exactly that, yeast. It means they are not done working yet. Top three things you can do to make your fermentations go great are
1. Pitching enough yeast
2. Adding oxygen
3. Getting the right temperature

The wort is pretty easy to make especially with kits. Fermentation is what will really make your beer. Do some reading and learning on those three things and you will succeed in making beer.
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Old 02-18-2011, 05:20 PM   #20
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There is sometimes a reason to secondary without adding extra flavors... and that is to free up a primary. I sometimes transfer wort to my bottling bucket and throw a lid and airlock on it just to let it clear before I bottle. There is so little trub & yeast that I just stir in a priming solution, let it sit for ten minutes and bottle.

As far as starters go, dry yeast varieties contain so many cells that a starter isn't necessary. I only recommend them if you want that particular variety of yeast and it is in a liquid solution when you buy it.

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