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Old 05-01-2013, 06:17 PM   #411
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Originally Posted by cuda6pak View Post
I have a question for the HBT experts and long primary folks - How long is it necessary to keep your fermenting beers in a precise temp controlled chamber?

I ask this because in the interest of saving space and money, I do not want to add a second fermentation chamber, but I also do not want to tie up my current one for 4 weeks with a high grav beer. Is there a certain threshold, say after 1-2 weeks (depending on high grav or style) where it is not so critical to keep a precise temperature? And what is the specific ambient temperature that is safe? I keep my house around 80* during the day (in summer, 60* in winter) and back down to below 70-75 at night. I don't want the 80* or 60* ambient temp to affect a beer negatively.
There was another post like this today, that brewer wanted to "age" the beer in the low to mid 70s folowing the primary fermentations.

I am not a biology or chemist but I think that once the yeast has finished consuming the majority of the food available and producing the majority of the flavor that what ever it does after that will not affect the beer much.

So say at three weeks it is 99% done... well what could that other 1% do to your beer? I say not much.

Also: some brewing schedules want you to raise the temp (Kolsch) up to around 72 before Lagering to make the yeast more active. FOR THE http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diacetyl REST.

Now you temp-ranges are 20 degrees so if you took you beer out of the fermentation chamber when it was 80 (a bit high) it would take a while for the beer to actually get to them temp.

BUT: If you had a cool spot in the mid 70s it would take a long time to it to get warm since the difference in temps is not very big... 10 degrees it would probably take a day or more.

The only thing I would worry about at those higher temps is "little beasties" Brett, wild yeasts, or infection might be possible but it all depends on how long you are going to leave it in the keg at those temps and if your sanitation is good.

So: when ever you have finished Primary fermentation or are very close to it I think you can move your beer out... I would say a minimum of three weeks for HG-beers or you could take some gravioty readings...
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Old 05-01-2013, 07:10 PM   #412
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cuda6pak View Post
I have a question for the HBT experts and long primary folks - How long is it necessary to keep your fermenting beers in a precise temp controlled chamber?

I ask this because in the interest of saving space and money, I do not want to add a second fermentation chamber, but I also do not want to tie up my current one for 4 weeks with a high grav beer. Is there a certain threshold, say after 1-2 weeks (depending on high grav or style) where it is not so critical to keep a precise temperature? And what is the specific ambient temperature that is safe? I keep my house around 80* during the day (in summer, 60* in winter) and back down to below 70-75 at night. I don't want the 80* or 60* ambient temp to affect a beer negatively.
I keep good temperature control until I'm at or beyond about 75% of expected attenuation. Then I either increase with heat or allow it to come to about 70 deg for 4-5 days. Then it's a matter of deciding how you want to age your beer through the completion of fermentation and clean up.
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Old 05-01-2013, 08:02 PM   #413
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How often are you checking the gravity?
I'll check after 3 days. I've used most of these yeasts enough (001, 3711, 007, Pacman) to know what they look like at various stages. Then I'll pull them out and let them warm up to about 70F and finish vi-ga-rose-ly

If you're doing healthy starters, oxygenating your wort, and pitching a sufficient cell count, it's not going to take most beers more than 2-3 days to ferment down to 75% of expected attenuation. Give it another 4-5 days for the yeast to do clean-up and off-gas, and you should be good to go.

I know the time issue is sensitive for some people, and I really don't want to re-awaken that beast. And, of course, this doesn't necessarily apply to bigger beers or specialty ingredient beers (oak, dry hop, herbs, bugs, etc). Brew how you make your best beers.

But in response to the poster who doesn't want to tie up his ferm chamber, know that there are a number of folks here who make great beer and go flame-to-glass in 10-14 days as a regular practice. It's all about process and healthy fermentation.

Cheers!
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Old 05-01-2013, 09:08 PM   #414
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But in response to the poster who doesn't want to tie up his ferm chamber, know that there are a number of folks here who make great beer and go flame-to-glass in 10-14 days as a regular practice. It's all about process and healthy fermentation.
I also don't want to get into the long term primary fight - but I agree. 3-4 days at low temp, 4-5 days at 70-ish and into the keg. I hit it with 25 psi to seal the lid then let her sit until a spot opens in my freezer. It's fine in a week, often better in two additional weeks.
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Old 05-02-2013, 06:55 AM   #415
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Recently I have cranked up the temperature when around 60%-70% of fermentation is complete. I start at 64-68 (depending on the beer) and will allow the temperature to free rise to 70-72 degrees until the final gravity is stable for a few days.
I do the same. The Yeast book also praises this method as well. It says with 1/3 to 1/4 fermentation remaining, slowly crank the temperature up 5F - 10F more than the target primary fermentation temp. It also talks about starting fermentation a tad cooler for the first 18 - 24 hours. Say, 2F lower. As this is when most off flavors are created.
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Old 05-04-2013, 03:40 AM   #416
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Old school here, been 2-stage fermenting for years.

Jamil and John talk about how home brewer's fermenters have broad bottoms (unlike commercial conicals) , but what about home brewers using conical fermenters for 10 gallon batches ?
Still no harm fermenting for 4 weeks in a conical?

Also, is there still a viable yeast colony suspended in the beer after 30 days for the purpose of bottle carbonation?

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Old 05-04-2013, 04:06 AM   #417
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Also, is there still a viable yeast colony suspended in the beer after 30 days for the purpose of bottle carbonation?
Plenty of yeast for bottle conditioning after 30 days... and more.
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Old 05-05-2013, 06:08 PM   #418
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Originally Posted by SleepyCreekBrews View Post
Old school here, been 2-stage fermenting for years.

Jamil and John talk about how home brewer's fermenters have broad bottoms (unlike commercial conicals) , but what about home brewers using conical fermenters for 10 gallon batches ?
Still no harm fermenting for 4 weeks in a conical?

Also, is there still a viable yeast colony suspended in the beer after 30 days for the purpose of bottle carbonation?
Actually, the recommendation came from the fact that Jamil uses conicals. He doesn't use a secondary since he just dumped yeast from the conical. That's something that's often overlooked in the recommendation to not use secondary.

There's plenty of yeast left for carbing after 30 days. Even if you lager the beer for months, there's still enough.
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Old 05-05-2013, 09:31 PM   #419
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So I'm doing my first batch of IPA and moved it to secondary and dry hopped after first week. How important is temperature control during the three weeks the recipe calls for in the secondary?

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Old 05-11-2013, 09:55 PM   #420
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Wow,

Just read all of this thread. Quick question. I have a basic Porter sitting in the primary. Plan on leaving there for about two months, due to my travel plans. At the end of the first month, I'd like to add some fresh mint and fresh vanilla beans that have been steeping in Cognac for a month. Can i throw it all in the primary, about 16 oz of Cognac (mint & Vanilla beans too) without harming the beer. About 16 oz of Cognac. It will be in a grain bag ( Mint and Vanilla). The cognac plus mint and vanilla will spend a month in the primary total. Opinions?

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