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Old 12-24-2012, 12:10 AM   #401
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Yes, but I don't think you want them in there for 2 weeks.
Denny,

I am pretty much doing your recipe, just without the bourbon. How long would you leave the vanilla in for?
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Old 12-24-2012, 05:21 AM   #402
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Recently I have cranked up the temperature when around 60%-70% of fermentation is complete. I start at 64-68 (depending on the beer) and will allow the temperature to free rise to 70-72 degrees until the final gravity is stable for a few days. Then sometimes I crash to 50 for a few days to floc out yeast and transfer to secondary, mainly for dry-hopping. I find this technique is fast, produces a very clean beer, and attenuates fully EVERY time. I started this after doing a clone of Alchemists El Hefe, which called for this strategy.

I believe that this is what a lot of professional breweries do in order to keep the yeast suspended as it reduces diacetyl, and cleans up and finishes fermenting the beer. It is not necessary for homebrewers due to the shape and size of the fermenters we use (as Jamil and JP pointed out), but I find the results quite satisfying and it enables me to have a higher turnover rate. A lot of people seem concerned about ester production with the early temp raise, but I have not had any issues. I use 1056 by the way.

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Old 12-24-2012, 04:53 PM   #403
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Denny,

I am pretty much doing your recipe, just without the bourbon. How long would you leave the vanilla in for?
I start tasting samples after 3-5 days. Sometimes it's ready then, sometimes it takes 10-12 days. It really depends on how fresh your vanilla is and how strong you want to flavor to be.
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Old 12-25-2012, 12:57 AM   #404
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It only took 3 days for mine to come out very strong. But, I'm sure different types of vanilla beans make a difference.

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Old 04-26-2013, 08:52 PM   #405
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I start tasting samples after 3-5 days. Sometimes it's ready then, sometimes it takes 10-12 days. It really depends on how fresh your vanilla is and how strong you want to flavor to be.
Funny that I should really (almost) find the answer to my question after reading almost 500 posts! I was wondering whether vanilla beans are considered "fruit" and need to be added to a secondary. I was reading your discussion on the Northern Forum before I brewed your BVIP and even there there was no consensus about primary vs. secondary (although it appeared that most followed your original recipe calling for a secondary). Do you have any final thoughts on this or more experience both ways yourself?

Many thanks! Can't wait to see how it turns out!
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:56 PM   #406
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Funny that I should really (almost) find the answer to my question after reading almost 500 posts! I was wondering whether vanilla beans are considered "fruit" and need to be added to a secondary. I was reading your discussion on the Northern Forum before I brewed your BVIP and even there there was no consensus about primary vs. secondary (although it appeared that most followed your original recipe calling for a secondary). Do you have any final thoughts on this or more experience both ways yourself?

Many thanks! Can't wait to see how it turns out!
Back when I made that recipe, I always used a secondary so it was the logical place to add the beans. Not wanting to mess with success, that's what I still do. Now that I seldom use secondary, I'm not sure I'd still make the recipe the same. Your choice, but adding to secondary is proven.
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Old 04-29-2013, 02:39 PM   #407
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Thanks Denny! I will try the secondary soon.

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Old 04-30-2013, 05:34 PM   #408
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Recently I have cranked up the temperature when around 60%-70% of fermentation is complete. I start at 64-68 (depending on the beer) and will allow the temperature to free rise to 70-72 degrees until the final gravity is stable for a few days.... I find this technique is fast, produces a very clean beer, and attenuates fully EVERY time.
This has become my standard practice also. I believe Tasty McDole does this on most beers as well. I haven't had a flabby-malt-character beer since I started doing this; nor have there been flavor issues. From what I hear and read, the flavor problems mostly come during the lag/growth phase in the first 24-36 hours of the cycle. At 60-70% to FG, you're generally well past the danger zone.
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Old 04-30-2013, 10:38 PM   #409
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How often are you checking the gravity?

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Old 05-01-2013, 04:49 PM   #410
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I have a question for the HBT experts and long primary folks - How long is it necessary to keep your fermenting beers in a precise temp controlled chamber?

I ask this because in the interest of saving space and money, I do not want to add a second fermentation chamber, but I also do not want to tie up my current one for 4 weeks with a high grav beer. Is there a certain threshold, say after 1-2 weeks (depending on high grav or style) where it is not so critical to keep a precise temperature? And what is the specific ambient temperature that is safe? I keep my house around 80* during the day (in summer, 60* in winter) and back down to below 70-75 at night. I don't want the 80* or 60* ambient temp to affect a beer negatively.

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