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Old 12-22-2012, 04:42 PM   #391
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Based on these I'm inclined to think that it does indeed form a protective layer over our beer.
I don't think anyone would argue that CO2 initially drops below other gasses, the question is, how long does it take for the gasses to mix? There would be more value to that experiment if they tried to light the candle in the jar back up at, say 10 second intervals after it initially went out.
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Old 12-23-2012, 01:24 PM   #392
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At first the CO2 will be layered - but the random movement of molecules will disperse it throughout the available volume of gas over time.

If we're talking about a system where there is some sort of barrier (air lock) then the concentration of CO2 will be higher than outside the vessel. The "blanket" that we're always talking about would more accurately be considered simply a higher concentration of CO2 inside the fermenter.

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Old 12-23-2012, 01:44 PM   #393
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But I think the debate is - if you pull the air lock to draw a sample, are you disturbing that blanket / higher concentration enough to make any appreciable difference on the beer.

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Old 12-23-2012, 02:17 PM   #394
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In a bucket, as opposed to a carboy, the large surface area would lead to a lot of mixing of gasses and lowering of the concentration of CO2 in the head space. There are a too many variables to quantify it, but once you replace the lid the gasses introduced will eventually mix with CO2 in there and create a new and lower concentration. There will be no blanketing within the closed space.

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Old 12-23-2012, 02:25 PM   #395
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No doubt... But back to my question - will it cause any appreciable impact to the end flavor of the beer? Maybe a question for the science sub-threads of the board...

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Old 12-23-2012, 02:48 PM   #396
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No doubt... But back to my question - will it cause any appreciable impact to the end flavor of the beer? Maybe a question for the science sub-threads of the board...
I've always bought into the idea that less head space was better for long term fermentation simply due to the smaller volume of gas in the container.

I think we might be hitting one of those "matters to big brewers, not for small brewers" things. We tend to drink our small beers quickly - and age big beers. Big beer companies need all of their beers to be shelf stable for longer periods.

I've had some terribly oxidized beers (not mine ) but those all suffered hot side aeration. They were terrible, cardboardy beers. I've had oxidized stouts that were in the bottle for too long - but they go pruney. What flavors indicate fermentation oxidation - or is it simply not an issue?

Anyone have a beer oxidize in the fermenter?
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:55 PM   #397
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No doubt... But back to my question - will it cause any appreciable impact to the end flavor of the beer? Maybe a question for the science sub-threads of the board...
Based on hundreds of batches of experience, I say no.
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Old 12-23-2012, 06:48 PM   #398
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I was listening to the "brew strong" episode on attenuation, and I think I heard them say this.

What I am wonder is this, I am about to brew my first AG on Christmas day, and I am brewing a vanilla robust porter. I have read to add the vanilla beans to secondary, but is that neccessary? Could I just throw the beans in after 2 weeks and let them sit the remaining two weeks in primary?

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Old 12-23-2012, 08:37 PM   #399
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Yes, but I don't think you want them in there for 2 weeks.

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Old 12-23-2012, 10:41 PM   #400
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I've been doing primary only for a few months now. It's working out great, with one exception. WLP051 California V yeast.

I noticed a bit too much diacetyl with this one. so, the next time I brewed my signature recipe (an American Pale), I brewed 10g and split it. I used WLP051 for 5g and WLP001 for 5g. The WLP001 was pretty good, slightly more hoppy than my usual for this recipe. The WLP051 had diacetyl again.
I haven't noticed this with any other yeast, when I primary only. I think, from now on, when I use WLP051, I will secondary like I used to.

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