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Old 08-26-2010, 01:19 AM   #141
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i bottle for the time beeing and most proponents of primary only seem to keg. so is it ok to leave it in primary for 3-4 weeks and then bottle? or should i leave it longer in the primary.

cheers
This is what I have done for my last several batches and I have been very happy with the results. I am sold on the "no secondary" thing- and I always bottle.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:55 AM   #142
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I will just say that I use a secondary for every beer that is not a wheat. 2 or 3 weeks in primary and one week in secondary on gelatin and polyclar. Any dry hopping is done in the secondary with polyclar and gelatin and pellets.

I seem to always get some haze if I don't use a secondary. It's bothersome that people chest thump and declare 27 weeks in primary MAKES BETTER BEER.

I have 9 ribbons in the last year (including 1st place HBT Hefe out of 28 beers) and one Best of Show for an American Lager out of 90 beers. I am not a great brewer like Jamil or Denny but my beers are good, IMO, and I use a secondary.
well to each his own.

i can see that some people see benefits of secondary, mainly clearer beer.

i just got this bug recently and am much more concerned with my technique and taste of my beers. so at this point i dont see benefit of secondary for my purpose.

also from reading a lot it seams that everyone has their own way, and there is no wrong one. just like you posted you succses in winning someone else did who does not do secondary. so i think brewer is more important than steps taken.

i like the RDWHAHB attitude, and plan doing just that. i like to get perfect results but after much reserch it looks like, there is so many variables that you just have to figure out what works for you, and don't get coaght up in doing things "the right" way

this site is amazing, but i dont thik you can take things word byy word as it seems different things work for different people

cheers!! you guys rock
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Old 08-26-2010, 11:37 AM   #143
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just read fthough all of this. i just brewed belgian strong pale, on monday now trying to decide on fermentation schedule. it seems like lots of people like primary only, so i am inclined to do that (especialy this being big beer - sg 1.085 or so)

i bottle for the time beeing and most proponents of primary only seem to keg. so is it ok to leave it in primary for 3-4 weeks and then bottle? or should i leave it longer in the primary.

cheers
I don't keg and i can definitely recommend leaving it in the primary for at least 4 weeks. For a big beer like that one, you may want to put it in a secondary after that, or just let it sit in the bottle for a good 6-9 months.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:00 PM   #144
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If the trick is to not use your calendar as a schedule for primary-to-secondary transfer, how can you get a gravity reading without opening the primary bucket and releasing that CO2? Isn't the whole point to keep that CO2 blanket there until you're ready to move to secondary?

My first beer I just used the airlock as the guide, when it slowed, a lot, I transferred. But I did it before it finished fermentation.

Any advice for my next batch based upon my techniques?

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Old 08-26-2010, 04:28 PM   #145
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If the trick is to not use your calendar as a schedule for primary-to-secondary transfer, how can you get a gravity reading without opening the primary bucket and releasing that CO2? Isn't the whole point to keep that CO2 blanket there until you're ready to move to secondary?

My first beer I just used the airlock as the guide, when it slowed, a lot, I transferred. But I did it before it finished fermentation.

Any advice for my next batch based upon my techniques?
C02 is heavier than air so you're not going to lose the whole blanket when you take a gravity reading. The beer will also keep giving off CO2 to reestablish the blanket. So yes, open it up and take a gravity reading while trying to disturb the beer as little as possible. When the reading stays the same over the course of a few days, fermentation is over. What we are advocating here, however, is that additional time in the fermenter will help to clean up your beer after fermentation is over.
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Old 08-26-2010, 04:35 PM   #146
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After reading a bunch of "I still use a secondary" posts on here I just want to point out that I didn't start this thread to say that an long primary/no secondary is hands down better than using a secondary. I posted to debunk the myth about autolysis and the fears that many brewers have about leaving their beer on the yeast cake. Many of us have found that the no secondary results in better beer, while others have found the opposite.

Do whatever works for you. There is no single way to brew, but at least give the long primary a shot and don't be scared of the autolysis boogeyman. Mr. Palmer is responsible for much of this fear, but has has corrected himself, which is why I posted his conversation with Jamil.

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Old 08-26-2010, 05:09 PM   #147
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Originally Posted by Shane_PB View Post
If the trick is to not use your calendar as a schedule for primary-to-secondary transfer, how can you get a gravity reading without opening the primary bucket and releasing that CO2? Isn't the whole point to keep that CO2 blanket there until you're ready to move to secondary?

My first beer I just used the airlock as the guide, when it slowed, a lot, I transferred. But I did it before it finished fermentation.

Any advice for my next batch based upon my techniques?
I would just give the beer enough time to finish fermenting, then rack it to secondary and catch a sample as I get the siphon going. If going to a secondary I don't see much point in taking a gravity reading first.

I know lots of folks say don't go by calendar but most properly pitched/aerated ales should reach terminal gravity within a week easy. And most of us intend to primary for longer than that. So I don't see the need to take a gravity reading before racking to a secondary if you've primaried for a couple of weeks or more. After a couple of weeks the FG of most ales isn't going any lower (whether it 'finished' or not), so just rack it and catch a sample along the way.
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Old 08-26-2010, 05:12 PM   #148
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Originally Posted by Dziuggy View Post
i bottle for the time beeing and most proponents of primary only seem to keg. so is it ok to leave it in primary for 3-4 weeks and then bottle? or should i leave it longer in the primary.

cheers
Perfectly fine to go 3-4 weeks in primary. If you primary in a bucket, I wouldn't go a lot longer than that. If you primary in SS or glass, you can give it more time if you want to.
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Old 08-26-2010, 09:56 PM   #149
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Originally Posted by Shane_PB View Post
If the trick is to not use your calendar as a schedule for primary-to-secondary transfer, how can you get a gravity reading without opening the primary bucket and releasing that CO2? Isn't the whole point to keep that CO2 blanket there until you're ready to move to secondary?

My first beer I just used the airlock as the guide, when it slowed, a lot, I transferred. But I did it before it finished fermentation.

Any advice for my next batch based upon my techniques?
First advice is to not use the airlock for anything other than releasing pressure. Unless you are positive your fermentation vessel is totally airtight, it is useless.
Secondly, don't use a secondary.
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Old 08-26-2010, 10:02 PM   #150
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Originally Posted by BillyBroas View Post
After reading a bunch of "I still use a secondary" posts on here I just want to point out that I didn't start this thread to say that an long primary/no secondary is hands down better than using a secondary. I posted to debunk the myth about autolysis and the fears that many brewers have about leaving their beer on the yeast cake. Many of us have found that the no secondary results in better beer, while others have found the opposite.

Do whatever works for you. There is no single way to brew, but at least give the long primary a shot and don't be scared of the autolysis boogeyman. Mr. Palmer is responsible for much of this fear, but has has corrected himself, which is why I posted his conversation with Jamil.
I am totally sold on leaving the beer in the primary for 4-6 weeks. My beers are amazingly clear now. An added bonus is one less container to clean, and less exposure to contaminants.
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