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Old 02-24-2014, 02:57 PM   #11
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Hi guys, I'm new in this forum and I didn't want to start a new thread just for this question, but here it goes:
I've made an Imperial Stout (extract plus grains) with an OG of 1100, it fermented for 9 days on the primary and I transferred to a secondary (this saturday).
The beer was still bubbling, like 1 every 4 minutes, and the FG was still 1038, and now I don't see any activity in the secondary. I peeked through the airlock and there is almost no yeast suspension (there is not a "whole" foam, just little dots).
I've realized I did a terrible mistake, but would you reccomend me to re-inoculate more yeast? What should I do? The room temperature is the same as during the primary fermentation (about 21 C) but the fermenter says 19 C.. The FG is still 1038 (measured today)
This is a completely different question and you should just go ahead and start a new thread.


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Old 02-24-2014, 03:00 PM   #12
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Did you come to HBT from a 1970s time machine?

There is no urgent need to get your beer off the yeast. They are not experiencing a yeast holocaust after fermenting your beer...they are taking a nap.
Please keep the insults and personal remarks out of this. Thanks.


Many people have different thoughts and experiences and those are all valid, even if someone doesn't agree.

I'm not in the "month in primary" camp at all, and I am a pretty decent brewer.

I'm also not a big "secondary" fan either.

I tend to keep most beers in the fermenter for at least 3 days after fermentation ends, and until the beer starts to clear (or is perfectly clear), and that is often 10-14 days. That's not a mantra, that's not a "you must do this or your beer will suck" piece of advice- it's my experience via trial and error and shows my preference for less yeast character in the final beer.

The reason there are several schools of thought on this is because we all have preferences. Some people prefer the flavor of a beer that spent 3-4 weeks in primary, and that's great for them. Some, like me, prefer the flavor of a beer that has been removed from the yeast cake a few days after fermentation finishes. That's also fine.

For new brewers- try it both ways and see which YOU prefer.

As long as fermentation is finished for at least 3 days, and the beer is starting to clear, it's ok to move it either to a carboy or to bottles.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:07 PM   #13
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Please keep the insults and personal remarks out of this. Thanks.


Many people have different thoughts and experiences and those are all valid, even if someone doesn't agree.

I'm not in the "month in primary" camp at all, and I am a pretty decent brewer.

I'm also not a big "secondary" fan either.

I tend to keep most beers in the fermenter for at least 3 days after fermentation ends, and until the beer starts to clear (or is perfectly clear), and that is often 10-14 days. That's not a mantra, that's not a "you must do this or your beer will suck" piece of advice- it's my experience via trial and error and shows my preference for less yeast character in the final beer.

The reason there are several schools of thought on this is because we all have preferences. Some people prefer the flavor of a beer that spent 3-4 weeks in primary, and that's great for them. Some, like me, prefer the flavor of a beer that has been removed from the yeast cake a few days after fermentation finishes. That's also fine.

For new brewers- try it both ways and see which YOU prefer.

As long as fermentation is finished for at least 3 days, and the beer is starting to clear, it's ok to move it either to a carboy or to bottles.
Sorry, Yooper. I'll mind my manners.

This same poster was advising people to make starters at 1.080 so that they would have enough yeast to pitch because if they made a starter at 1.040 they'd be underpitching and not properly preparing their yeast for their 1.080 batch of beer.

I agree, one of the great things about brewing is that there are many avenues one can take to make great beer. There is always another aspect one can focus on and improve upon in their process.

But, what is pretty much undeniable is that leaving the beer on the yeast for a month or even two does not ruin the beer. You may prefer beer that has been removed sooner, but the idea that autolysis starts after just a couple weeks is provably false. New brewers should not fear the impending doom of autolysis if they don't hurry and transfer to a secondary.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:18 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Please keep the insults and personal remarks out of this. Thanks.


Many people have different thoughts and experiences and those are all valid, even if someone doesn't agree.

I'm not in the "month in primary" camp at all, and I am a pretty decent brewer.

I'm also not a big "secondary" fan either.

I tend to keep most beers in the fermenter for at least 3 days after fermentation ends, and until the beer starts to clear (or is perfectly clear), and that is often 10-14 days. That's not a mantra, that's not a "you must do this or your beer will suck" piece of advice- it's my experience via trial and error and shows my preference for less yeast character in the final beer.

The reason there are several schools of thought on this is because we all have preferences. Some people prefer the flavor of a beer that spent 3-4 weeks in primary, and that's great for them. Some, like me, prefer the flavor of a beer that has been removed from the yeast cake a few days after fermentation finishes. That's also fine.

For new brewers- try it both ways and see which YOU prefer.

As long as fermentation is finished for at least 3 days, and the beer is starting to clear, it's ok to move it either to a carboy or to bottles.
+1! I agree 100% with Yooper on the issue. I haven't been brewing very long but I know from my experience, and other homebrewer's stuff I've tried, that I prefer a beer that is taken off the cake and aged in bottles.

Currently, I only secondary when I am heavily dry hopping or adding fruit/oak. It's not necessary, but I like to open up my primary so I can start another batch while the current one is in the secondary. If I don't have any additions such as the ones mentioned above I will stick to the "steady FG and bottle" method.
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Old 02-24-2014, 09:24 PM   #15
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Sorry, Yooper. I'll mind my manners.

This same poster was advising people to make starters at 1.080 so that they would have enough yeast to pitch because if they made a starter at 1.040 they'd be underpitching and not properly preparing their yeast for their 1.080 batch of beer.

I agree, one of the great things about brewing is that there are many avenues one can take to make great beer. There is always another aspect one can focus on and improve upon in their process.

But, what is pretty much undeniable is that leaving the beer on the yeast for a month or even two does not ruin the beer. You may prefer beer that has been removed sooner, but the idea that autolysis starts after just a couple weeks is provably false. New brewers should not fear the impending doom of autolysis if they don't hurry and transfer to a secondary.
Absolutely- we need to correct misinformation in order to keep this forum a useful resource and I think it's important to point out things that are flat out wrong. I appreciate all of the input from other experienced brewers. We just have to do it in a manner that is not insulting or derogatory of course.
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:20 PM   #16
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The issue isn't really whether autolysis exists or not, but to what degree in different settings. Healthy yeast in a five gallon batch like most home brewers do don't start dying like they do in the pressure at the bottom of a giant conical. From what I've heard (I'm not a pro brewer), autolysis is a big concern for commercial breweries, but not so much for homebrewers for this reason. Also from what I've heard (I'm not old enough to remember), homebrewer's yeast was of much worse quality in the not so distant past, so that was also a concern for autolysis.

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Old 02-25-2014, 02:42 AM   #17
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I do not know what the argument is. I have done both but have not notice a difference. I use secondary only if I need to dry hop. Otherwise I leave it in the primary for 3-4 weeks. I usually dry hop for a short time like a week and still leave the beer in the primary for 3 weeks before dry hopping. I understand the preferences but must agree that secondary is falling out of favor. Read Palmer


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Old 02-25-2014, 02:51 AM   #18
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Yes superstorm, that sounds like a fine plan

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Old 02-25-2014, 02:55 AM   #19
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Quite a detailed discussion on the matter here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f36/seco...t-rack-155255/

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