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Old 04-13-2012, 02:12 AM   #1
woodwaybrewz
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Default Saison Fermentation

Hello, I started a "New Belgium Saison Belgian Style Farmhouse Ale" 12 days ago. I measured OG at 1.064. It had a vigorous fermentation for a few days and now airlock activity has slowed. I measured it last night and it was 1.010.

Per recommendations for this style (white labs Saison 565) I raised the temperatures up into the 80's. My past practice has been to keep beers in the primary for about 4 weeks instead of the 2 weeks recommended by the brew shop.

Three questions--

First question: Is leaving it in primary for 4 weeks to clear and clean up the right call for the Saison?

Second question: Do I need to maintain the high temperatures (82-86 degrees) while the beer clears over the next couple of weeks? Temps in the lower 70's would result if I turn the heater off.

Third question: Do I need to maintain higher temperatures while it carbonates for a few weeks in the bottles?

Thanks to anyone who responds. Your comments are appreciated.

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Old 04-13-2012, 02:44 AM   #2
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Saisons especially benefit from sitting on the cake for a month. You don't need to worry about keeping the temp in the 80s once primary fermentation is finished (same for bottling).

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Old 04-13-2012, 05:25 PM   #3
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Thanks BigRob! I appreciate your help. I feel better about letting it clean up in the carboy now!

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Old 04-13-2012, 05:49 PM   #4
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FWIW the Wyeast French Saison yeast tends to do better with lower temps. Mine has rocked at 64-70 degrees. The Belgian Saison stumbles unless it is way hot (and even then sometimes).

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Old 04-13-2012, 08:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizBrew
FWIW the Wyeast French Saison yeast tends to do better with lower temps. Mine has rocked at 64-70 degrees. The Belgian Saison stumbles unless it is way hot (and even then sometimes).
I had exactly the same experiences with these yeasts. Had to jack my Belgian version almost to 90 after 10 days in the 70s to get it to finish and ended up with hot fusels .

The French Saison ripped through the same wort recipe in less than 7 days after pitching at 65 and letting free rise to a max of 71. It also gives a silky mouthfeel--this is my new favorite beer, which is saying something for an IPA guy!
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Old 04-14-2012, 01:42 AM   #6
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Just let it sit and chill for 3 or so weeks. The yeast will slowly finish the wort off. The fermentation time table for Saison Dupont is I think 21 days or so.

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Old 04-14-2012, 03:05 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinghole View Post
Just let it sit and chill for 3 or so weeks. The yeast will slowly finish the wort off. The fermentation time table for Saison Dupont is I think 21 days or so.
I think Dupont pushes the temps to 90 F to get fermentation over in less than a week. Time in the fermenter is money.


For the Op. 4 weeks in primary is probably OK. I would not leave it there that long. With the high temps. I think you are tempting autolysis problems. High temps will degrade the yeast quicker.

Once fermentation is over, maintain high temp for a couple of days, and then you can bring back to room temp.
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Old 04-14-2012, 11:22 AM   #8
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I don't dispute Dupont pushing 90F during primary fermentation, but from reading Farmhouse ales they do a secondary conditioning period where it fully attenuates at around 70F.

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