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Old 10-05-2013, 09:30 PM   #1
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Default Safale US-05 near 72 hours and no activity

Strange. first time I use this strain. But it's also the first time I got this lag.

I did rehydrate the yeast. 15 min soaking @90F, a shake and then another 30 min waiting with intermittent shakes. Pitched at 70F, aerate, then let it rest 66-68F waiting for the thing to start.

Should I pitch another pack of US-05 ?

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Old 10-05-2013, 09:40 PM   #2
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Typically you dont rehydrate us-05 and other fermentis strains, just pitch and let it go. Check the gravity, if it hasnt started then throw in another pack without rehydrating

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Old 10-05-2013, 09:42 PM   #3
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@nicklepickles I tought rehydrating was a 'nice to have' but not mandatory. Can it actually made the thing worse ?

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Old 10-05-2013, 09:47 PM   #4
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Typically you dont rehydrate us-05 and other fermentis strains, just pitch and let it go. Check the gravity, if it hasnt started then throw in another pack without rehydrating
If you don't rehydrate, you're killing off about half the yeast.
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:02 PM   #5
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So I did nothing wrong.. Bad yeast batch?

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Old 10-05-2013, 10:08 PM   #6
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So I did nothing wrong.. Bad yeast batch?
when you rehydrated the yeast did you see activity? you should have seen it get foamy

I always rehydrate my dry yeast then mix a bit of wort in with to get it to the same temp as the wort I am pitching it in

all the best

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Old 10-05-2013, 10:16 PM   #7
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Typically you dont rehydrate us-05 and other fermentis strains, just pitch and let it go. Check the gravity, if it hasnt started then throw in another pack without rehydrating
I rehydrate all dry yeast, including US-05 and S-04. Good results with both.

To the OP, what do you mean by "no activity"? No airlock bubbles? Fortunately, that's not conclusive. Any small leak in your bucket lid (or carboy stopper) will allow the CO2 to escape via that route of least resistance. The only way to know for sure is to take a gravity reading. From what you described doing, you may well have fermentation happening just fine. US-05 is pretty darn reliable.
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Old 10-06-2013, 01:41 AM   #8
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I rehydrate all dry yeast, including US-05 and S-04. Good results with both.

To the OP, what do you mean by "no activity"? No airlock bubbles? Fortunately, that's not conclusive. Any small leak in your bucket lid (or carboy stopper) will allow the CO2 to escape via that route of least resistance. The only way to know for sure is to take a gravity reading. From what you described doing, you may well have fermentation happening just fine. US-05 is pretty darn reliable.
+1 to all of this.
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Old 10-06-2013, 01:55 AM   #9
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[QUOTE=brew_ny;5562014
I always rehydrate my dry yeast then mix a bit of wort in with to get it to the same temp as the wort I am pitching it in
S_M[/QUOTE]

This is called 'proofing' the yeast, and is a very good idea. You add a bit of wort or you can even boils some water/sugar and let it cool and add that. If the yeast are alive you will see foam/bubbles on top of the mixture. This lets you know that they are alive and well. You definitely did the right thing by rehydrating dry yeast. Osmotic shock would have killed about 50% of the cells had you pitched directly into the wort. Even if you don't care that your pitching rate just went down by 50% you have a bunch of dead yeast that are going to settle to the bottom and begin to break down. It's a lose/lose not to rehydrate.

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Old 10-06-2013, 02:26 AM   #10
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This is called 'proofing' the yeast, and is a very good idea. You add a bit of wort or you can even boils some water/sugar and let it cool and add that. If the yeast are alive you will see foam/bubbles on top of the mixture. This lets you know that they are alive and well. You definitely did the right thing by rehydrating dry yeast. Osmotic shock would have killed about 50% of the cells had you pitched directly into the wort. Even if you don't care that your pitching rate just went down by 50% you have a bunch of dead yeast that are going to settle to the bottom and begin to break down. It's a lose/lose not to rehydrate.
+1 to everything except the reference to "proofing". I've never heard that any of the dry yeast makers suggest proofing. It's something you do with liquid yeast when you have doubts about the viability. Dry yeast has to be pretty darn old or really abused for that to be an issue.

What brew_ny described is called "attemperating" and is an essential part of rehydrating dry yeast. You want to get the rehydrated yeast to within 10-15*F of the temp of the wort before pitching. It's done by adding small amounts of the wort (which should be in the low 60's) to the warmer yeast slurry a bit at a time to slowly lower the temperature of the yeast. I find that is normally takes 3-4 additions of wort (3-5 minutes apart) into the yeast slurry to get the temp low enough to pitch. You can do this after chilling the wort, but still waiting for the suspended gunk to settle to the bottom of the kettle.

It's sort of like when you bring a fish home from the pet store. You don't just dump it into your aquarium. You put the bag in there for several minutes so that the temps get close enough for the fish to make a smooth transition.
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