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Deutsch22 11-24-2012 10:11 PM

rehydrating the yeast
 
Is is possible to rehydrate the yeast for too long? I did it or a little over 30 minutes.

This is my first batch ever and I'm just curious. It's been just under 24 hours and I'm not seeing any bubbling in my airlock. What could be some other problems? Am I just getting too impatient? Lol

Thanks!

Beer-lord 11-24-2012 10:16 PM

30 minutes is not a problem unless it was too hot.
What type of beer is it and what was the OG?

Deutsch22 11-24-2012 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beer-lord
30 minutes is not a problem unless it was too hot.
What type of beer is it and what was the OG?

It is a European pilsner, I didn't get it too hot, I actually took the temp, it was around 100.

It may have been a little longer than 30 but no longer than 40.

Forgive my ignorance, what is OG??

I tried to do as much research as possible but I was too excited to wait to brew!

liquiditynerd 11-24-2012 10:34 PM

Original gravity. Did u use a hydrometer?

I don't like to pitch above 85F. your prolly ok, have you shaken, swirled the fermentor?

Deutsch22 11-24-2012 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liquiditynerd
Original gravity. Did u use a hydrometer?

I don't like to pitch above 85F. your prolly ok, have you shaken, swirled the fermentor?

I did not use the hydrometer


I did aerate the fermenter. I poured it back and forth 3 separate times.

liquiditynerd 11-24-2012 10:38 PM

What yeast and what is the temp where there beer is?

Hex23 11-24-2012 10:39 PM

OG is original gravity. It's a measure of the density of the prefermented wort on the specific gravity scale (i.e. density relative to water).

No problem to rehydrate longer than 30 min. I know that common rehydration instructions say to pitch within 20 or 30 min, but I've pitched after an hour with no problems. I think the advice is so that the yeast don't start using their reserves, so it's not ideal to wait too long, but you're probably OK.

Dry yeast usually start a little faster, but no need for you to worry. Sometimes it takes up to 72 hours.

Hex23 11-24-2012 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by liquiditynerd
I don't like to pitch above 85F.

OP: did you rehydrate in 100 degree water or pitch into 100 degree wort?

Deutsch22 11-24-2012 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hex23

OP: did you rehydrate in 100 degree water or pitch into 100 degree wort?

I rehydrated at 100, My wort was 75, I made sure of that!

When you chill the wort, what's the typical
Time you want to aim for? I'm sure the faster the better but what is a good time to aim for? I don't have a wort chiller but I'm gonna get one. Right now I fill up the bathtub full of cold water and ice. It worked pretty fast.

huntingohio 11-24-2012 11:42 PM

Well there is no set time for chilling a wort, but its generally thought that the faster the better. The reason behind this is there is less exposure to the outside world giving it less chance for an infection.

Fermentation can take 24-72 hours to start. I dont worry until 48 or more hours have past. I even sometimes find that the airlock isnt bubling but the yeast are making the wort nice and frothy [creating a krausen]. RDWHAHB.


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