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Old 04-06-2014, 09:24 PM   #1
Smellyglove
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Default Question about pride of London clone: 1968 temps & D-rest

I'll be brewing a pride of London clone this weekend and from what I read in a BYO article about this beer is that they pitch at 17C, raise to 20C for main fermentation and back to 17 again.

First. Will this mean they raise it until FG is reached? Or just during the initial stormy parts of fermentation?

Second: I'll be using wy1968 for this. It says that a D-rest is needed for this yeast. If the 20C temperature is to be held until FG is reached, will I still need to do a D-rest at even higher temps after FG is reached?

If I'm supposed to turn the temperature back down when I see krausen is on its way back I guess I still have some more points left, or is this wrong, will the 1968 eat everything at once? If I still have some points left when going back to 17C, I guess it will be a small roller coaster in temperature if I'm supposed to do the D-rest also when I'm having a few points left.

How would you do it?

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Old 04-06-2014, 09:58 PM   #2
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Not sure why they recommend a d-rest. I use 1968 a lot. I start fermentation at 65F and hokd until it skows and then allow it to rise to 68-69 until it finishes, give it another week to clear and package. 1968 is highly flocculant and the rise in temp keeps it busy until it's done. Its a great yeast and produces a super clear beer

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Old 04-06-2014, 10:24 PM   #3
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Not sure why they recommend a d-rest. I use 1968 a lot. I start fermentation at 65F and hokd until it skows and then allow it to rise to 68-69 until it finishes, give it another week to clear and package. 1968 is highly flocculant and the rise in temp keeps it busy until it's done. Its a great yeast and produces a super clear beer
It's actually wyeast themselves that recommend it. The other option was wlp002, which has half of the diacetyl production of the 1968. But I want to try the 1968 since I've never used it before.

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Old 04-07-2014, 12:17 AM   #4
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It's actually wyeast themselves that recommend it. The other option was wlp002, which has half of the diacetyl production of the 1968. But I want to try the 1968 since I've never used it before.

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I can tell you that fermenting as I described has never produced diacetyl in any of my batches
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Old 04-07-2014, 04:16 AM   #5
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duboman is describing the correct temp profile for 1968/002 to keep it from dropping out too early. If it does, it's very hard to rouse back up again. I let it finish up in that 68-69*F range (sort of a d-rest I suppose) then cold crash the primary into the mid-30's for 5-7 days.

Since WY1968ESB and WLP002 are the same strain, I question how one could produce just half the diacetyl vs. the other.

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Old 04-07-2014, 10:40 AM   #6
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I wouldn't drop it back down to 17. You're likely to loose the momentum of the yeast. This strain is a hard flocculator, especially on the first pitch. I would agree with above... Start at 17 slowly raise it to 20. Just make sure you give it a day or two after it drops, and you shouldn't have any diacetyl issues.

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Old 04-07-2014, 11:01 AM   #7
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I wouldn't drop it back down to 17. You're likely to loose the momentum of the yeast. This strain is a hard flocculator, especially on the first pitch. I would agree with above... Start at 17 slowly raise it to 20. Just make sure you give it a day or two after it drops, and you shouldn't have any diacetyl issues.

This. With the ramp to 20c you won't need to follow with a d-rest. As mentioned, 1968 is incredibly flocculant--a very cool strain.
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Old 04-07-2014, 11:20 AM   #8
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i agree with above, but i have had diacetyl issues with this yeast. in my experience, if it quits early, you're in butterville. a steady rise like 17-20 keeps the yeast happy and the brewer happy. 20 essentially acts as the d-rest. with this temp regime i can go grain to glass, with great clarity, in 12 days easily.

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Old 04-09-2014, 09:04 AM   #9
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Alright. Thanks for all your input. I'll go with a more classic fermentation then.

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Old 04-12-2014, 08:17 PM   #10
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1968 has been my house strain for years now. I usually start at 17, wait until the fermentation has almost stopped, and then slowly raise the temp to 20 or 21, and wait another week or so. It is normal for me to leave the beer in the primary for a month or longer, depending on my schedule. I never have "butter" problems anymore by being patient. I always have clear, "clean" beers by not being in a hurry, like I was when I was first starting out as a new brewer. For some reason, I decided to re-read the Wyeast smack pack info, and now feel somewhat confused...
The site mentions pitching into a 65-72 F wort, wait for obvious signs of fermentation, foam, bubbling airlock, etc., and then adjust to desired fermentation temperature. This makes me wonder, should I start every batch at 65-70, and as soon as I see fermentation, roll the temperature back? I believe we are only referring to 1 or 2 days, what to all of you think about this method?

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