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Old 08-13-2012, 08:12 PM   #1
jwm1485
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Default primary for high gravity

I brewed a high gravity clone of double bastard (1.110) and am wondering how long to leave it in primary. I did a starter and pitched another smack pack both were American ale II.

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Old 08-13-2012, 08:16 PM   #2
PoorYorick
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How big was your starter and how many gallons did you end up with? I just brewed a beer close to this yesterday...

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Old 08-13-2012, 09:17 PM   #3
duboman
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You should leave it in the primary for as long as it takes to reach a confirmed final gravity If you plan on bulk conditioning it for longer than a month I would personally rack it over to secondary with as little head space as possible and keep it there for as long as you want.

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Old 08-14-2012, 04:05 AM   #4
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I made a 4.5 gallon batch of high gravity beer (started with a 1.110, and finished with a 1.024). Love the taste of it. I ended up only bottling half of it, and putting the rest to age in a small oak barrel for a couple months.

After using 3/8 of a cup of priming sugar to bottle the first half of the batch, and conditioning at 70F for 4 weeks, my beer came out completely flat. I used WL001, which will tolerate that level of alcohol just fine according to my LHBS and WL website, confirmed by my attenuation rate.

Guess I have 14 bottles of flat high alcohol beer to drink....

When I go to bottle the remaining 10L of this beer, should I use more priming sugar? Or did I kill all remaining yeast and try those dreaded carbonating caps?

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Old 08-14-2012, 11:55 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kallen View Post
I made a 4.5 gallon batch of high gravity beer (started with a 1.110, and finished with a 1.024). Love the taste of it. I ended up only bottling half of it, and putting the rest to age in a small oak barrel for a couple months.

After using 3/8 of a cup of priming sugar to bottle the first half of the batch, and conditioning at 70F for 4 weeks, my beer came out completely flat. I used WL001, which will tolerate that level of alcohol just fine according to my LHBS and WL website, confirmed by my attenuation rate.

Guess I have 14 bottles of flat high alcohol beer to drink....

When I go to bottle the remaining 10L of this beer, should I use more priming sugar? Or did I kill all remaining yeast and try those dreaded carbonating caps?
A general rule for priming is 1oz per gallon of beer, 3/8 cup seems a little light but give them more time, high gravity beers sometimes take longer, a lot longer to carbonate. In the future you should weigh out your sugar, not measure, there can be a big difference between the two measurements.
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Old 01-10-2013, 05:51 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duboman View Post
A general rule for priming is 1oz per gallon of beer, 3/8 cup seems a little light but give them more time, high gravity beers sometimes take longer, a lot longer to carbonate. In the future you should weigh out your sugar, not measure, there can be a big difference between the two measurements.
All it took was time. With the high ABV, it took 8+ weeks to carbonate. My left over bottles as well as all the barrel aged 22oz bottles are kept at room temperature so that they continue to condition.
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