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-   -   Pressure Canning Starter Wort Process (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/pressure-canning-starter-wort-process-338765/)

chief764 06-30-2012 04:55 PM

Pressure Canning Starter Wort Process
 
I thought I'd share my process for canning starter wort. This seems to be the easiest method for me.

Here's a list of items I use during the process:
- Presto model 1781 23-quart aluminum pressure cooker/canner.
- Bottling bucket.
- 14 one-quart wide-mouth mason jars with new lids.

Recipe for a 1.040 wort that just fills 14 one-quart mason jars:
3 lbs. light DME
3.25 gal. water

Mix the DME and cold water in the bottling bucket until fully dissolved.

Canning process:
Make sure the canning rack is in the bottom of the canner. Fill 7 mason jars from the bottling bucket's spigot. Place the lids on the jars and place them in the canner. I follow the instructions from the canner's manual for adding water, venting, etc. then process the jars of wort for 25 minutes at 15 lb. pressure. Repeat for the other 7 jars.

beertroll 06-30-2012 10:33 PM

Thanks for this. I've been considering doing the same thing. How do you store the canned wort? Is room temperature safe, since it's canned, or is refrigeration a must?

chief764 07-01-2012 12:53 AM

Room temp is fine.

theredben 07-01-2012 03:53 AM

If you are pressure canning wort, it would be best not to sample the starter, nor to empty it into your wort. Even decanting the starter could still have enough botulism toxin to be harmful. I know that everyone says that you won't get botulism from pressure canned wort, and that somehow canned food are magically "sterile", but once the boiling stops, and fresh air moves into the canner, there is a chance that Clostridium botulinum spores could make it into your wort. Regular wort is not acidic enough to prevent the growth of C. botulinum and since you would be adding the contents of your start after the boil, the toxin would not be denatured by heating. This is straight from the fda website "Most of the 10 to 30 outbreaks that are reported annually in the United States are associated with inadequately processed, home-canned foods [...]". I know this is "chicken little" thinking, but seriously it is worth it? Probably not. Even refridgeration may not be enough, as the Colorado State University wesite states the 4 of the 7 types can grow at 38F. Seriously, people die from this quite often, and the bacterium is everywhere in the soil and floating around in the air. Will your starter get contamined with botulism toxin, probably not. Will I take the chance, no!

http://www.fda.gov/food/foodsafety/foodborneillness/foodborneillnessfoodbornepathogensnaturaltoxins/badbugbook/ucm070000.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6026a5.htm?s_cid=mm6026a5_x

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09305.html/

Greenbasterd 07-01-2012 04:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theredben (Post 4216347)
If you are pressure canning wort, it would be best not to sample the starter, nor to empty it into your wort. Even decanting the starter could still have enough botulism toxin to be harmful. I know that everyone says that you won't get botulism from pressure canned wort, and that somehow canned food are magically "sterile", but once the boiling stops, and fresh air moves into the canner, there is a chance that Clostridium botulinum spores could make it into your wort. Regular wort is not acidic enough to prevent the growth of C. botulinum and since you would be adding the contents of your start after the boil, the toxin would not be denatured by heating. This is straight from the fda website "Most of the 10 to 30 outbreaks that are reported annually in the United States are associated with inadequately processed, home-canned foods [...]". I know this is "chicken little" thinking, but seriously it is worth it? Probably not. Even refridgeration may not be enough, as the Colorado State University wesite states the 4 of the 7 types can grow at 38F. Seriously, people die from this quite often, and the bacterium is everywhere in the soil and floating around in the air. Will your starter get contamined with botulism toxin, probably not. Will I take the chance, no!

http://www.fda.gov/food/foodsafety/foodborneillness/foodborneillnessfoodbornepathogensnaturaltoxins/badbugbook/ucm070000.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6026a5.htm?s_cid=mm6026a5_x

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09305.html/


no. you might be thinking of a hot water bath. pressure cookers are tottaly sealed and at 15psi its over 240f in there which is hot enought to kill anything.. the bottles seal before they see air.. the only people who get botulism make mistakes, or just do water bath methods of canning with food that is not acidic..

theredben 07-01-2012 04:39 AM

No, I am talking about a "sealed" canner. While I realize they are actually quite safe, I just want to get the message across that these things need to be handled carefully. Since you are not cooking these things when using, you do need to be quite careful.

chief764 07-01-2012 05:51 PM

What a buzz kill. Thank you Mr. Monitor.

Veedo 07-01-2012 08:18 PM

Interesting. Once the beer ferments out, ph should drop and it should die?

beertroll 07-01-2012 11:19 PM

I think I'm with Greenbasterd on this; the pressure canning process will kill absolutely everything, the jars are sealed while they are still under very high heat and pressure, and the jars are not unsealed until use. So how does the bacteria get introduced to the wort?

aubiecat 07-01-2012 11:37 PM

If you are an idiot don't can your wort or you might make it on the Darwin award list. If you are reasonably intelligent then you might be able to can your wort and survive. Welcome to the easier side of making started wort.

It doesn't easier than this.


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