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Old 01-28-2013, 05:58 PM   #51
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daytrippr,
i think you misunderstood. i was referring to the medical oxy regulators which have a selector switch for Liters/Min. these regulators do not actually have a volumetric flowmeter in them, they have simply been calibrated to select a certain psi which, during their normal usage of unrestricted flow of gas out the feed tube, will result in the selected lpm shown on the selector knob.

you are correct that a household water meter IS a volumetric flowmeter, and DOES gives accurate volumetric reading of fluid passing thru pipe regardless of flowrate. i was simply pointing out that the medical oxygen regulator lpm selector switch does not work this way and so don't make the mistake of thinking that you can use that to measure lpm in our homebrewing application. that's why i suggested the use of an inexpensive thorpe tube inline from O2 tank to directly measure volumetric flowrate.

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Old 01-28-2013, 10:14 PM   #52
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Ah, ok, my bad, I've never seen such a regulator, and when I see "flow meter" I've always assumed a flow gauge is present (I don't think I'd trust any regulator that didn't have a meter or gauge of some appropriate type).

All of the flow meters I have (for welding as well as my beer oxygenation rig) have integrated flow gauges...

Cheers!

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Old 01-29-2013, 01:51 AM   #53
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CORRECTION: i just noticed that i had read my new gauge wrong. it wasn't 13.5 psi, it was 13.5 kPa, which is 1.958 psi. sorry everybody! so it was 3 min @ 2 psi/13.5 kPa thru a 2 micron diffusion stone into a five gallon bucket at 68 degrees F that gave me my 12 ppm DO. hopefully everyone will see this correction!!

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Old 01-29-2013, 02:49 AM   #54
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All calibrated scientific measurement aside, I've been using one second per point of gravity for 5 gallon batches with great success. 1.045, 45 seconds, 1.060 gets a minute, etc. My flow is enough to agitate the surface without excessive foaming. I suspect the flow rate is a factor, but maybe not as much as we think. As you push the flow up, you get bigger bubbles that shoot to the surface faster, which wouldn't add more oxygen than slower, finer bubbles. Again, I haven't measured this and am not claiming it as fact, but it makes sense and I've had very consistent results. I don't send my starters off to a lab to have the cells counted either but that's working well too!!!

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Old 01-29-2013, 02:55 AM   #55
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i like the time unit-per-point of grav idea. hadn't thought of that. as long as you're seeing vigorous ferments and good attenuation, it's all good. and i suspect you're right about smaller bubbles being more efficient. makes sense.

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Old 01-29-2013, 05:00 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zymurgistic View Post

* using a medical oxygen regulator with the lpm setting won't work as a flowmeter here, unfortunately. that's only accurate for unrestricted flow, and we have restricted flow due to the airstone, and to a lesser extent, the atmospheric pressure of 15 in or so of liquid above the outflow. so it has to either be a thorpe tube style volumetric flowmeter inline from the tank, or just regulator psi. reg psi will be a decent number since, if another guy is using the same micron airstone, his rig should act more or less the same as yours, and same psi/time should give same ppm DO. the advantage of the thorpe tube is that it will also tell you how much of your tank you're using per bucket, which is also a concern.
Hmmmm - I'm not 100% sure on this caveat. Most all of the medical regulators will deliver the set flow up to 50 psi.

I haven't put a pressure gauge on my system, but I doubt that it is above 50 with the .5 micron stone. I just slip fit the hoses on my system and they don't blow off.
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Old 01-29-2013, 08:47 PM   #57
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Wow....all great infomation as I have just started using a stone with the hardware store O2 bottles. Now I have a starting point and I will use the sec/per point of gravity method. Prior to that I used a drill and paint stirrer for around 60 sec and had good results. I just want to try something better.

Thanks for the useful info.

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Old 01-29-2013, 09:08 PM   #58
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From the research I have done and have been using.

.5 micron stone for pure oxygen. Smaller bubbles dissolve easier in your wort. You do not want the oxygen bubble to reach the top of your wort. You want them to dissipate within the wort before they reach the top.

I do 1 ppm for 1 minute per the Yeast book recommendation by Chris White. Not sure what the optimal setting would be for a 2 micron stone.

Oxygen Welding Tank -
http://www.harborfreight.com/20-cubi...der-92810.html
Get an empty from Harbor Freight with 20% off coupon and exchange it at a gas supply place for a full one. Supposedly medical tanks and welding tanks are filled exactly the same way from the same source, one is just is "certified". Bigger upfront investment but you wont have to constantly mess with getting the small ones at the home improvement stores, The 20 cubic tank will last you a long, long time.

Add this -
http://www.amazon.com/Oxygen-Regulat...ygen+meter+1-4
Whatever you get needs a CGA450 connection for the tank. It is great to be able to precisely control the flow of oxygen.

and a stainless steel oxygen wand and you are set. The wand allows you to quickly / easily position the stone at the bottom of your fermenter.

I did a fair amount of research before I decided on this route and so far I have had excellent results.

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Old 01-30-2013, 10:07 PM   #59
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Great info here, I started adding pure O2 to my wort before I even started doing yeast starters and saw great improvements in my fermentation.

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Old 01-30-2013, 11:39 PM   #60
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Great info here, I started adding pure O2 to my wort before I even started doing yeast starters and saw great improvements in my fermentation.
I did too. I think that's why I got away without doing starters on so many batches. I honestly believe for brews under 1.060 OG it's actually more important than a starter, assuming fresh quality yeast. That said, you add in the starter to your process and your chances of a bad batch go down even more. I think that's what home-brewing is all about. We can never be perfect or as precise as we'd like, but with knowledge and simple at home techniques we can make some damn fine beer!!
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