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Old 02-15-2012, 07:07 PM   #1
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Default Nottingham vs Safale S04 vs Coopers Yeast (Which is best to prevent yeast bite)

I have never used Safale S04 or Nottingham, but I have had yeast bite in my beer using Coopers. I know Nottingham and S04 is meant to be really good. Therefore, which is the best at reducing the yeast taste in my beer?

I have a very prolonged after-taste in my beer. It is not infected, but I can tell it has that 'home-brew' taste. Would Nottingham or S04 have the potential to reduce this?

Also, does bottle conditioning improve on yeast bite compared to just the flavour of the beer? This after-taste is overpowering the taste of the beer.

Cheers.

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Old 02-15-2012, 07:13 PM   #2
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What temperature is your beer during fermentation?

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Old 02-15-2012, 07:17 PM   #3
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I fermented in my kitchen which is constantly at 20 Celsius. I know that it never got more than that. There is no fruity tones (like banana), just a very bitter taste that is not in commercial beers (not good bitter).

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Old 02-15-2012, 08:07 PM   #4
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20 C is a bit warm, fermentation produces some heat by itself. Something closer to 16 C ambient would be better.
Another thing to look at would be your water, if you have excessive sulfate or magnesium it can lead to more perceived bitterness.
There's also the issue of time, if you haven't let your beer age enough you could have excessive yeast in suspension. Is the beer clear?

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Old 02-15-2012, 08:47 PM   #5
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I'm not a Cooper's fan, so either S04 or S05 or nottingham would be much better in my opinion.

However, it's very important to keep the fermentation temperatures where the manufacturer recommends, so when you choose a yeast strain make sure you take that into consideration. S04 is very nice and "clean" at 62 degrees, but very fruity at 72 degrees. Nottingham is very clean at 60 degrees, and "ok" at 65 degrees, but gets positively foul above about 72 degrees. S05 is good from 65-74ish.

Of course, that's beer temperature, not room temperature. The room temperature isn't important, but the fermentation will produce heat so it will often be higher than ambient temperature. I've seen it 8-10 degrees warmer than ambient temperatures during fermentation in the summer. So it's important to keep the temperature under control. That will improve the flavor greatly and get help rid of that "yeast bite" or weird woody flavor that Cooper's often has.

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Old 02-15-2012, 09:38 PM   #6
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Rob, just for the sake of asking, are you sure that you're tasting yeast bite? I've found that bitter aftertaste is often due to hard water. What is your water source? What style beers are you brewing? (I assume they are extract kits?)

BTW, I've never used Coopers yeast but I have had good success with Nottingham, S-04 and S-05.

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Old 02-15-2012, 09:51 PM   #7
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What is best to eliminate the yeast bite is more time in the fermenter. 3 weeks minimum, 4 or more for a dark beer. Give that yeast time to finish the ferment, time to clean up the side effects of the ferment, and time to mature and settle out.

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Old 02-15-2012, 09:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Nottingham is very clean at 60 degrees, and "ok" at 65 degrees, but gets positively foul above about 72 degrees. S05 is good from 65-74ish.
I completely agree. When I was just getting started, the best I could do for temp control was about 75* and I made two batches with Nottingham that were less than pleasant. US05 under the same conditions produced a better beer (but still not great by any means).
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Old 02-15-2012, 09:55 PM   #9
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I used my tap water and it is quite hard water. Yes, I am doing extract kits. I guess the only thing I can do is to experiment with different yeasts, use bottled water that is not hard and use lower temperatures in order to find the cause of the problem.

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Old 02-15-2012, 10:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robms88 View Post
I used my tap water and it is quite hard water. Yes, I am doing extract kits. I guess the only thing I can do is to experiment with different yeasts, use bottled water that is not hard and use lower temperatures in order to find the cause of the problem.
I'm willing to bet that it's a combination of the Cooper's yeast and too-high fermentation. Coopers yeast has a distinctive "woody" or earthy flavor that I dislike, and combined with being near 80 degrees in your kitchen, that would give some poor flavors.
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