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Old 01-21-2013, 06:09 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by CarnieBrew View Post
75 degrees is NOT too warm to pitch at, especially with kit yeast. Kit yeast can survive much worse!

It's a little too warm for optimal fermentation results, sure, but pitching at 75 then bringing your fermentation temp down towards 65 over a couple of hours will be fine for a kit brew.
.
I have to disagree with you on that. Sure, the yeast can survive (they can survive up to 120 degrees), but that's not how to create optimum flavors. Yeast get stressed when they cool down, but not when they warm up in their optimum fermentation area.

Try it yourself.

Pitch yeast in a 60 degree wort and allow it to rise to 65.
Pitch another one at 75 degrees, and cool to 65.

You will notice a difference in the final beer. There will be flavor differences, possibly very significant depending on yeast strain. Also, the cooled-down version will probably finish at a higher FG and attenuate less.

There are lots of links and great info on the internet, if others want to investigate this for themselves.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:28 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper

I have to disagree with you on that. Sure, the yeast can survive (they can survive up to 120 degrees), but that's not how to create optimum flavors. Yeast get stressed when they cool down, but not when they warm up in their optimum fermentation area.

Try it yourself.

Pitch yeast in a 60 degree wort and allow it to rise to 65.
Pitch another one at 75 degrees, and cool to 65.

You will notice a difference in the final beer. There will be flavor differences, possibly very significant depending on yeast strain. Also, the cooled-down version will probably finish at a higher FG and attenuate less.

There are lots of links and great info on the internet, if others want to investigate this for themselves.
Thanks, Yooper. I think I understand what you are saying. My practice has been to cool the wort to a degree or two below the optimum range for the yeast (packet says 60-66, I would cool to 58). Then I allow it to slowly warm (in a swamp cooler) to maybe 61 for a few days and then warmer yet (say 65 in this case) over the course of the next week. Is that what you are saying is ideal? I'm hoping so as that has been my practice.

Note: I had terrible fusels in my first batch, so I have done everything possible since then to keep temps in check.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:40 PM   #13
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Thanks, Yooper. I think I understand what you are saying. My practice has been to cool the wort to a degree or two below the optimum range for the yeast (packet says 60-66, I would cool to 58). Then I allow it to slowly warm (in a swamp cooler) to maybe 61 for a few days and then warmer yet (say 65 in this case) over the course of the next week. Is that what you are saying is ideal? I'm hoping so as that has been my practice.

Note: I had terrible fusels in my first batch, so I have done everything possible since then to keep temps in check.
Yes, that's exactly what I'm saying! There are lots of sources out there- the book "Yeast" by Chris White and Jamil Zainasheff, podcasts on the Brewing Network with John Palmer, and so on discussing this.

Yeast health is the #1 cause of good (or bad) results!
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Old 01-21-2013, 08:23 PM   #14
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Thanks!

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Old 01-22-2013, 03:11 PM   #15
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I am fermenting the same kit as you right now. i am about 72 hours in and I believe the fermentation has stopped. I had to use a blow off hose the first 24 hours. I didn't rehydrate yeast, nor do I have a hydrometer. I kept the temps from 65-69. The beer is starting to clear out already.

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Old 01-22-2013, 04:03 PM   #16
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I am fermenting the same kit as you right now. i am about 72 hours in and I believe the fermentation has stopped. I had to use a blow off hose the first 24 hours. I didn't rehydrate yeast, nor do I have a hydrometer. I kept the temps from 65-69. The beer is starting to clear out already.
if you don't have a hydrometer you can't know for sure what is going on with the fermentation, my guess is a good as yours in this case. just because the beer clears out does not mean that the fermentation is over. if you are in this for the long run you may want to acquire a hydrometer.
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:47 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by eastoak
if you are in this for the long run you may want to acquire a hydrometer.
They are less than $10. I would say it is worth it for this batch, even if you plan on quitting after immediately afterward.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:40 PM   #18
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I bought a hydrometer and as of yesterday it was at 1.017 and mighty tasty.

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Old 01-27-2013, 03:29 PM   #19
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Quote:
I have to disagree with you on that. Sure, the yeast can survive (they can survive up to 120 degrees), but that's not how to create optimum flavors. Yeast get stressed when they cool down, but not when they warm up in their optimum fermentation area.

Try it yourself.

Pitch yeast in a 60 degree wort and allow it to rise to 65.
Pitch another one at 75 degrees, and cool to 65.

You will notice a difference in the final beer. There will be flavor differences, possibly very significant depending on yeast strain. Also, the cooled-down version will probably finish at a higher FG and attenuate less.
This is the best advice about yeast that every brewer could use to produce better beers.
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Old 02-08-2013, 03:24 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by Yooper

75 is way too hot! If the yeast was pitched at that temperature, or worse, even higher, the fermentation is just simply over.

You can check with a hydrometer if you'd like. Or pop it open and look for a krausen ring or remnants of a krausen. I have a feeling it's finishing up.
I don't agree with 75* being way to hot. You can keep the fermentor at a nice 68* but once fermentation starts it is not uncommon for the fermentor to go up a few degrees because of the yeast activity. Yeast can stay alive past 100*

My Ipa's are always in the mid 70s during fermentation and they come out stellar.

I wouldn't worry one bit . Rdwdahb
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