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Old 01-17-2013, 10:48 PM   #11
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It tastes ok, gravity still 1.030. I gave it a shake in case the yeast had gone to sleep after feasting on too much fermentables. Or might be spoiling. I guess I'll know in a couple of days.

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Old 01-17-2013, 10:49 PM   #12
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The recommended pitching temp on a Baltic Porter was over 65F? Usually they ferment colder. They are practically a lager. Well, technically they can be fermented with lager yeast OR ale yeast, but in either case they should be fermented much lower than 65F. If you pitched a lager yeast at that temp, you could very well get sulfur smells.


EDIT: OK so I looked up that strain on White Labs' website...I don't think I've used that one before, but it looks like 65F is the recommended range.


So, other possibilities:

1. It could be underpitching, or perhaps a combination of underpitching and a not-very-healthy vial of yeast to start with, but usually that presents with other aromas and flavors, and not really the sulfurous thing.
2. Could be some kind of bacterial infection.
3. Could be your water source.


Regarding #2 and #3, there is a particular strain of bacteria which thrives in warm/hot water environments (not boiling, though) that produces the rotten egg smell. In fact it is fairly common to get that bacteria growing in water heaters, and then your hot tap water can start coming out smelling like rotten eggs.

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Old 01-17-2013, 11:46 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weirdboy
The recommended pitching temp on a Baltic Porter was over 65F? Usually they ferment colder. They are practically a lager. Well, technically they can be fermented with lager yeast OR ale yeast, but in either case they should be fermented much lower than 65F. If you pitched a lager yeast at that temp, you could very well get sulfur smells.

EDIT: OK so I looked up that strain on White Labs' website...I don't think I've used that one before, but it looks like 65F is the recommended range.

So, other possibilities:

1. It could be underpitching, or perhaps a combination of underpitching and a not-very-healthy vial of yeast to start with, but usually that presents with other aromas and flavors, and not really the sulfurous thing.
2. Could be some kind of bacterial infection.
3. Could be your water source.

Regarding #2 and #3, there is a particular strain of bacteria which thrives in warm/hot water environments (not boiling, though) that produces the rotten egg smell. In fact it is fairly common to get that bacteria growing in water heaters, and then your hot tap water can start coming out smelling like rotten eggs.
I used an ale yeast that recommended pitching between 70-75. I pitched a little below that and it has been holding steady at about 63 aside from going up to 67/68 when the fermentation was most vigorous. I just use the water from my tap (I live in SF) and it was cold rather than hot. Can this still cause that infection? As for the yeast, it is actually my first experience with liquid yeast. Assuming it was not a bad batch, is 1.073 too high a gravity for one vial?
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Old 01-18-2013, 02:02 AM   #14
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I just took the first gravity reading since pitching the yeast and it's at 1.019 right now. I gave it a taste and it was a little yeasty but it wasn't bad at all. I'm hoping it turns out well

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Old 01-18-2013, 02:12 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by scoundrel View Post
Not at all. Some yeast are worse offenders than others. White Labs Kolsch yeast comes to mind... stinky!

Yeah, the Kolsch yeast smells terrible, but the beer tastes so nice when it is done. Nothing to worry about IMO.
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Old 01-18-2013, 02:21 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Han_Solo View Post

Kind of off of the thread topic, but is it necessary to rack to secondary? It's the biggest beer I've ever made (OG 1.073) and was unsure as to whether or not the beer would actually benefit from a secondary. I'd prefer to just forget about it and let it sit for a few weeks, but I am unsure if racking is required to clean up the sulfury/eggy aroma it was letting off.

Basically I am asking if the yeast in the primary will do the work on its own, or will it make a noticeable difference if I rack it?
Unless its an IPA i always rack big beers becuase i ljke to age them in a secondary and it also frees up my fermentors.
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:06 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Han_Solo View Post
Kind of off of the thread topic, but is it necessary to rack to secondary? It's the biggest beer I've ever made (OG 1.073) and was unsure as to whether or not the beer would actually benefit from a secondary. I'd prefer to just forget about it and let it sit for a few weeks, but I am unsure if racking is required to clean up the sulfury/eggy aroma it was letting off.

Basically I am asking if the yeast in the primary will do the work on its own, or will it make a noticeable difference if I rack it?
I just let it sit for a few weeks to clean up then go straight to a keg. I could see doing that if you bottle or use fruit but a keg is as good a secondary as a carboy.

Actually its better since I attach a liquid ball lock to the end of my autosiphon and rack it to a CO2 purged keg. It basically eliminates oxygenation from the equation.
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Old 01-27-2013, 09:50 PM   #18
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Added another pile of yeast to mine, all seems ok now!

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Old 01-28-2013, 08:31 AM   #19
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New to home brew talk. Great stuff in this place. Shout out to all the NWers!

Scoundrel, what is a liquid ball lock? And hey to my home state of MD!

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Old 01-28-2013, 01:29 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by ElectricAlphaAcidTest View Post
New to home brew talk. Great stuff in this place. Shout out to all the NWers!

Scoundrel, what is a liquid ball lock? And hey to my home state of MD!
Hi buddy and welcome. It's typically the black ball lock that you attach to the "out" side of a keg.

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