Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > moving open fermentation vessel w/ Ringwood

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-03-2010, 01:02 PM   #1
balto charlie
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
balto charlie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Md
Posts: 823
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts

Default moving open fermentation vessel w/ Ringwood

Hey all: I am doing an open fermentation w/ Ringwood yeast. It is fermenting in my basement @ 66-68F. I'm thinking about moving it to a warmer spot ~72F for a diacetyl rest after 2 weeks of primary fermentation. Should I, or is this temp good enough for D rest? I would hate to disturb the crusty top that is preventing crap from entering my beer. I do not have ferm wrap for temp control. It's spooky w/ open ferm, great smell in the basement though.
Thanks all Charlie

__________________
Drinking Firestone Wookey Black IPA clone,
Oktoberfest, Red APA
Conditioning: Pale ale
Secondary IPA, Brown ale
Primary
On Deck ESB, Belgian Dubbel, Evil Twin
balto charlie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2010, 06:19 PM   #2
smakudwn
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smakudwn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: St.Charles, MO
Posts: 1,003
Liked 46 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Don't know much about the ringwood yeast , but r u sure you need a D rest while fermenting that warm?

__________________
smakudwn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2010, 07:09 PM   #3
balto charlie
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
balto charlie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Md
Posts: 823
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smakudwn View Post
Don't know much about the ringwood yeast , but r u sure you need a D rest while fermenting that warm?
That what I need to know. This yeast is notorious for producing D. I just prefer to leave it, seems happy, smells great. I've read somewhere that folks bump the temps to 70-72F. Maybe I'll just get a Ferm wrap.
__________________
Drinking Firestone Wookey Black IPA clone,
Oktoberfest, Red APA
Conditioning: Pale ale
Secondary IPA, Brown ale
Primary
On Deck ESB, Belgian Dubbel, Evil Twin
balto charlie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-03-2010, 07:33 PM   #4
GuldTuborg
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
GuldTuborg's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: OH
Posts: 3,379
Liked 421 Times on 305 Posts
Likes Given: 232

Default

Diacetyl rests are usually done with lager fermentations. With ale temperatures, diacetyl cleanup isn't a problem unless you do something silly like cold crash or filter too early. Just keep the temps steady or steadily rising a little bit throughout fermentation and you'll get good cleanup of any diacetyl in time.

That said, I've never actually used any Ringwood yeasts. The above should hold true for any ale yeast, though. As a general rule, more time and slightly higher temps should get you more cleanup of diacetyl, esters, etc. What produces the best beer for your palate will always take some experimentation, though. We can't tell you for sure.

__________________

Don't worry, be hoppy.

GuldTuborg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-04-2010, 01:44 AM   #5
ksbrain
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mystic, CT
Posts: 1,018
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I'm with you, Charlie. I would want to D-rest ringwood. I say if you can afford it, just go get a fermwrap or heating pad or something to warm it up.

Props for going with the open ferment. I don't think I could do it. I mean, how did you protect it while you waited for it to get active? I get nervous enough while it sits sealed in a carboy in a fridge in my basement.

__________________
ksbrain is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-05-2010, 12:12 PM   #6
corncob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 139
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Is this your first time open fermenting? I don't have a place to try it, but I was under the impression that breweries that used an open ferment got the beer in a closed container by the time CO2 production slowed significantly (a few days)--since the constant rising of CO2 kept anything from falling into the beer.

I am really interested in your experiment and I hope you get good results. I am just curious about your plan/reasoning. I am always chasing English ale flavors and if I lived in a place where houses had basements you better believe I would be trying this, too.

__________________
corncob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-05-2010, 12:34 PM   #7
kanzimonson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 1,987
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts

Default

You definitely will want to get rid of diacetyl with this beer, but don't wait until it's two weeks out. Keep the temp steady for the first 3-4 days of fermentation, and then ramp it up a degree or two per day until a max of 72-75. You want to keep the yeast active for the diacetyl rest. If they flocculate and settle, they'll do less work for you.

I use 1968 London ESB in most of my ales and it can definitely produce some diacetyl (apparently not to the degree of Ringwood, though). I follow the above procedures and my beers are as clean as you'll get for English yeasts. I'm typically able to get my 1.060 beers into a keg within 10 days (though they benefit from a little more aging). The point is, they're clean.

__________________
kanzimonson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-05-2010, 01:17 PM   #8
dzlater
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,046
Liked 27 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 116

Default

I read about doing a test for diacetyl in the Yeast book by Zaineshef.
It's pretty easy and I don't understand why more people don't do it.
Lot's of questions about diacetyl rests on here but I haven't seen any about doing this test. Here is a link I googled up.
http://www.winning-homebrew.com/diacetyl-test.html

__________________
dzlater is offline
feenaughty Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-06-2010, 01:30 PM   #9
balto charlie
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
balto charlie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Md
Posts: 823
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ksbrain View Post
Props for going with the open ferment. I don't think I could do it. I mean, how did you protect it while you waited for it to get active? I get nervous enough while it sits sealed in a carboy in a fridge in my basement.
Hi ksbrain: after I pitched the yeast I lightly covered plastic bucket with aluminum foil. About 12 hours later when fermentation was well under way I took off the foil and replaced with nylon mesh(keep the mice out I think at this point I will cover again with lid and bubbler and move to a warmer area perhaps with a heating pad. I figure moving may disturb the krausenbut also stir up the yeast a little to finish off this brew.

Quote:
Originally Posted by corncob View Post
Is this your first time open fermenting? I don't have a place to try it, but I was under the impression that breweries that used an open ferment got the beer in a closed container by the time CO2 production slowed significantly (a few days)--since the constant rising of CO2 kept anything from falling into the beer.

I am really interested in your experiment and I hope you get good results. I am just curious about your plan/reasoning. I am always chasing English ale flavors and if I lived in a place where houses had basements you better believe I would be trying this, too.
Hey corncob: It's my first time trying open fermentation. Everything i read says that this yeast must not be covered due to its need for O2 and air movement. It got that now for the diacetyl rest.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanzimonson View Post
You definitely will want to get rid of diacetyl with this beer, but don't wait until it's two weeks out. Keep the temp steady for the first 3-4 days of fermentation, and then ramp it up a degree or two per day until a max of 72-75. You want to keep the yeast active for the diacetyl rest. If they flocculate and settle, they'll do less work for you.
Hey kanzim: I am at 1 week and plan to move to warmer with lid. hopefully the temps and movement will help the yeast do their job. I figure I need to put a lid on it now because I am going to move it possibly "breaking" the krausen seal

Quote:
Originally Posted by dzlater View Post
I read about doing a test for diacetyl in the Yeast book by Zaineshef.
It's pretty easy and I don't understand why more people don't do it.
Lot's of questions about diacetyl rests on here but I haven't seen any about doing this test. Here is a link I googled up.
http://www.winning-homebrew.com/diacetyl-test.html
Thanks dzlater: , I'll check it out
__________________
Drinking Firestone Wookey Black IPA clone,
Oktoberfest, Red APA
Conditioning: Pale ale
Secondary IPA, Brown ale
Primary
On Deck ESB, Belgian Dubbel, Evil Twin
balto charlie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-06-2010, 09:03 PM   #10
corncob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Columbia, SC
Posts: 139
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

It would be really great, for the sake of science, if you could update this thread when you get to drinking this one. What is the recipe, BTW?

__________________
corncob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
5g fermentation vessel for primary rodrigobologna Fermentation & Yeast 4 07-10-2010 01:04 AM
Corny shaped fermentation vessel murphyslaw Fermentation & Yeast 2 04-05-2010 08:53 PM
My ringwood doesn't taste like their ringwood jmo88 Fermentation & Yeast 9 03-25-2010 01:42 AM
Ringwood attenuation jmo88 Fermentation & Yeast 5 02-16-2010 03:16 AM
Wyeast Ringwood Ale hankisanerd Fermentation & Yeast 14 11-05-2009 03:36 AM