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Old 06-15-2011, 05:10 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by pjj2ba View Post
You might try replacing the beet sugar with glucose/dextrose. It has been shown that when glucose is added, the yeast will produce more esters, than when other sugars are used.
interesting, I knew sugars increased it, but I never thought of some producing more than others. I woulda thought sucrose would give more since its more complex tho. never understood why sugar would either way, any idea?
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Old 06-15-2011, 07:04 PM   #22
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beet sugar (sucrose) is a di-saccharide composed of a glucose and a fructose. The yeast have to break this bond before they can utilize them. The extra step could make a difference, sending the products down different pathways than if they just imported the glucose

I have one paper that says the reason is unclear, with one possibility being that more glucose somehow leads to more Acetyl CoA for ester production, and a second possibility being that more fusel alcohols are produced with glucose, and these are then used to make esters.

Article here - download the pdf

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Old 06-15-2011, 07:44 PM   #23
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thanks for the info. I was just reading something Kai wrote about it and it sounds like the reason is due to a delayed switch in primary food source of glucose to maltose, which stresses the yeast. maybe thats why belgians add some sugar late?

http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Experiment_Pitching_Rate_and_Oxyge nation

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Old 06-15-2011, 08:04 PM   #24
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From what I've read the Belgians typically add beet sugar or beet sugar derived syrups directly to the kettle.

How about trying to pitch at a lower starting temperature, say 65-67F, let it rise to 70F, hold there until fermentation is 3/4 done, then gradually rise to 75-80F to get the yeast to attenuate and clean up.

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