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Old 08-29-2012, 12:00 PM   #11
lukefindley
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i poped the top again last night to have a smell and another look to be sure it wasnt fuzzy. its doesnt smell like toe jam or dirty belly buttons (although "Dirty Belly Buttons Ale" might be a good name for a brew). it smelled like super duper strong beer. the scent of alcohol almost knocked me down.

thanks for all the insight. i think i'll just syphon below that floating hop/peach island into a secondary and let her sit another week before i bottle.

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Old 08-30-2012, 07:07 AM   #12
helmingstay
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Just because it's mold doesn't make it terrible, and it can be mold without being fuzzy (the fuzz is often mold's reproductive stage), and just because it's mold doesn't mean it can grow on bread ( just like lions don't eat grass, plenty of molds don't eat bread).

When fruit is submerged in the wort, it's protected from mold. Any fruit exposed to air is susceptible to mold. This is one good reason to add fruit to secondary -- fermentation isn't intense enough to bouy the fruit up so high. To add to the confusion, a yeast pellicle sure looks like mold the first time you see it (and yeast is, after all, a fungus), but really is actual yeast doing strange and mysterious yeast things.

It's a little hard to see what's going on in the pic, but I think your plan of secondary is a good one. I wouldn't necessarily stir the fruit into the beer, which it sounds like you're not doing
One comment from Radical Brewing that I just read -- the weird mix of sugars in fruit can make it hard to predict priming levels, and extended primary (watching for any fermentation activity) can lower the risk. Mosher says that his only bottle bombs ever came from, I think, a heavily cherried beer primed at normal levels...

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Old 08-30-2012, 11:08 AM   #13
lukefindley
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good info helmingstay. thank you.

do you think it would be a bad idea to pour all of the contents currently in this bucket (my primary) through a strainer and into my secondary? or would that stir things up to much? im going to transfer this into a secondary this weekend one way or another. the fact that it is in a 'true brew' bucket makes it difficult for me to tell just how low i can dip my syphon into the beer without getting into some trub on the bottom.
another thought i had was to use a sanitized slotted ladle and scoop the floating hops/fruit (with funky "hop cap" included) up and out of the bucket, discard it, and then syphon into my secondary and add a bit more pureed peaches and then let that sit a week and then bottle.

Jesus, i love this blog. its so helpful and informative!

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Old 09-07-2012, 05:11 AM   #14
helmingstay
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How'd the transfer go?
Only thing I'd say -- wait waaaaaay longer than a week between adding fruit and bottling, unless bottle bombs you like...

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