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Old 12-17-2013, 10:28 AM   #1
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Default Looking for a nice fruity liquid yeast

Ok so I have used dry yeast for 4 1/2 years now and am looking to try some liquid to enhance flavors since going into all grain within this past year. I usually make citra pale ales (ibu of 46ish and dry hop) and am looking for something to replace my Safale 05 and 04 (my beer always seem bland on the yeast side, especially with 05). My basement stays a nice 62 in the winter and high 60 in the summer. What liquid yeast would be a good go to for creating a nice clean flavor with some estery profile adding some fruit or citrus (definitely love orange in my beers)? Sedimentation is not a huge make or break for me. I cold crash alot anyways. Looking to finish a beer (1.012- 1.016) in just a couple weeks. I have noticed Wyeast Whitbread says it delivers this and american ale yeast 2. Any recommendations?

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Old 12-17-2013, 11:42 AM   #2
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I'd suggest other varieties of English ale yeasts. It's a tricky pick, as i've found yeasts that have the best character of flavor also have their quirks, such as being lazy fermenters, poor floculation, etc.. I would suggest using yeasts like Thames Valley or Burton Ale yeast. Burton's adds some very nice honey and pear highlights if allowed to ferment towards its higher temperature range. Windsor (dry yeast) is also an interesting pick but lazy. Less lazy, but very clean yeasts like WLP007 (English II) and Pac-Man yeasts are monsters that rip through wort fast and floc out hard (I hear Chico is similar but I haven't used that yet). I'm also experimenting with yeasts that aren't specific to brewing such as lalvin V-1116. This yeast is extremely floral and fragrant and adds a very complex smell to table beers.

You might try making five gallons of a basic citra pale ale and then divide it up into five different one gallon batches, with a packet/vial of different types of yeast in each one. That way, you will discover what each yeast profile can bring to the beer and which taste you find most pleasing for a bigger batch. Also, if the beers suck, it's much easier on the heart and the wallet to pour out a one gallon batch than a five gallon batch.

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Old 12-17-2013, 12:44 PM   #3
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Wlp001 or wyeast 1056 are both supposed to be the same strain as 05. It's a great clean yeast that has a big temp range and ferments with high apparent attenuation (usually around 75% for me). Use this yeast with plenty of late/dry hops for those citrusy notes

I'll second the wlp007 as a nice choice if you want a cleaner English strain

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Old 12-17-2013, 01:49 PM   #4
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Wyeast 1028 has been a workhorse for me, I use it for just about anything. fermented on the warm side (70-73F) it will yield some nice fruity esters.

Wyeast 1968 is quite aromatic but it does have issues with stopping short, especially with OG over 1.050.

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Old 12-17-2013, 02:00 PM   #5
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You mentioned Wyeast American Ale II (1272), which may be right up the alley you're looking for. It's a solid fermenter that will produce some nice tangy/citrus notes when fermented around 72-74°. It's one of my favorites and I use it a lot for American wheat brews.

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Old 12-17-2013, 02:35 PM   #6
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You could try some Belgian strains too. I really like WLP400. Wyeast Forbidden Fruit is quite fruity in an apple/pear/banana kinda way.

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Old 12-17-2013, 03:37 PM   #7
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Wlp644 is supposedly a fruit bomb. Its a Brett. Read up on several threads. When used for primary ferment with no aeration it appears to generate extreme fruit aromas. It's well suited for IPA and APA apparently.

TD

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Old 12-17-2013, 03:47 PM   #8
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As a couple of people have already said, wlp007. It's my new go to yeast. It does everything, great flavor, attenuates well, ferments fast, and flocculates well, what's not to like? Very versatile strain, I just used it in a russian imperial stout

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Old 12-17-2013, 08:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aiptasia View Post
I'd suggest other varieties of English ale yeasts. It's a tricky pick, as i've found yeasts that have the best character of flavor also have their quirks, such as being lazy fermenters, poor floculation, etc.. I would suggest using yeasts like Thames Valley or Burton Ale yeast. Burton's adds some very nice honey and pear highlights if allowed to ferment towards its higher temperature range. Windsor (dry yeast) is also an interesting pick but lazy. Less lazy, but very clean yeasts like WLP007 (English II) and Pac-Man yeasts are monsters that rip through wort fast and floc out hard (I hear Chico is similar but I haven't used that yet). I'm also experimenting with yeasts that aren't specific to brewing such as lalvin V-1116. This yeast is extremely floral and fragrant and adds a very complex smell to table beers.

You might try making five gallons of a basic citra pale ale and then divide it up into five different one gallon batches, with a packet/vial of different types of yeast in each one. That way, you will discover what each yeast profile can bring to the beer and which taste you find most pleasing for a bigger batch. Also, if the beers suck, it's much easier on the heart and the wallet to pour out a one gallon batch than a five gallon batch.
I have read some stuff saying that the Thames Valley and Burton can produce alot roasty type of flavors? Even sour apple? I have used the windsor in a wheat beer and also t58 which was great for a saison.
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Old 12-17-2013, 08:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrickyDick View Post
Wlp644 is supposedly a fruit bomb. Its a Brett. Read up on several threads. When used for primary ferment with no aeration it appears to generate extreme fruit aromas. It's well suited for IPA and APA apparently.

TD
Wouldnt a brett make my beer sour?
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