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Old 04-02-2013, 06:21 PM   #1
megadave5000
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Default Long Term Fermentation with Brett

Hello,

I brewed up a Scottish style ale that finished a little high (1.030) due to mash temp being too high. My friend convinced me to throw in some Brett C. and leave it in secondary for a year - I did so but now I have some questions:

1) We picked a year as the timeframe just from doing some cursory reading about this strain, but could the Brett finish sooner? Would we check with a hydrometer (check for stable gravity reading over, say, a two-month timeframe) or is there a different, better method?

2) There is a small layer of yeast that fell out in secondary. It's small, maybe 1/4 - 1/2 inch in my glass 5 gal fermentor, but I'm worried this will autoyze. Any thoughts? Would it be wise to transfer to a tertiary?

3) At bottling, would you expect the Brett to do an adequate job of carbonating or would it be so weak that I'd have to add some small amount of yeast as well?

4) Should I get new lines/fermentor/bucket/wine thief after they contact the Brett-infected beer? I read so many things both ways, I would like something a tad bit more definitive (keep one set separate for sours vs. just do a good job of cleaning). This is arguably my biggest worry - that I will be infecting many subsequent batches because I thought it would be interesting to do an "experiment."

Thanks much, I'm sure I'll have more questions but I guess I lept before I looked.



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Old 04-06-2013, 04:34 AM   #2
GSul
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You should be alright at bottling time, I think. Give it time and it will prime. Hey, that rhymed! Also, I think your equipment should be OK. Be sure to was and sanitize well. I have a carboy that I rarely use now after fermenting cider in it. It still has that unique odor. I suppose I could use it though, if I really had to. If the yeast layer is small, I would consider it insignificant.
As for the time frame, I would say it's better to wait a while. I'm not well informed on Brettanomyces, though.

Cheers,

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Old 04-06-2013, 01:46 PM   #3
joshareed
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Quote:
Originally Posted by megadave5000
1) We picked a year as the timeframe just from doing some cursory reading about this strain, but could the Brett finish sooner? Would we check with a hydrometer (check for stable gravity reading over, say, a two-month timeframe) or is there a different, better method?

2) There is a small layer of yeast that fell out in secondary. It's small, maybe 1/4 - 1/2 inch in my glass 5 gal fermentor, but I'm worried this will autoyze. Any thoughts? Would it be wise to transfer to a tertiary?

3) At bottling, would you expect the Brett to do an adequate job of carbonating or would it be so weak that I'd have to add some small amount of yeast as well?

4) Should I get new lines/fermentor/bucket/wine thief after they contact the Brett-infected beer? I read so many things both ways, I would like something a tad bit more definitive (keep one set separate for sours vs. just do a good job of cleaning). This is arguably my biggest worry - that I will be infecting many subsequent batches because I thought it would be interesting to do an "experiment."

Thanks much, I'm sure I'll have more questions but I guess I lept before I looked.
Here's my experience with all the brewing I've done with Brett and bugs:

1) Brett is slow in the secondary but if the gravity readings are the same across two months, you should be good. If it is cool, you can try to get the carboy above 68-70F. That'll wake the Brett up.

2) You don't have to worry about autolysis with Brett. It will turn that layer of yeast into food.

3) If you prime properly, it'll carbonate but may take longer than normal, especially if you go the whole year. You can always pitch some clean dry yeast to ensure quicker carbonation.

4) The glass carboy should be fine if you clean properly but I personally keep a separate set of buckets and auto siphon. I don't dedicate special tap lines in my kegerator. Since the finished beer is only contact with possibly infected lines on the short trip to my glass.

Cheers,
Josh
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