Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Let's talk belgian!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-02-2012, 03:42 PM   #11
AmandaK
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: KCMO
Posts: 1,501
Liked 136 Times on 103 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JordanThomas View Post
I find trippel's to have more banana characteristics, while BSGA's tend to be a little more citrusy. The fruitiness is there in both, but I find that of a Trippel to be less harsh.
For me, I find the Tripel to be more orange/clove/perfumy and the BGSA to be more pear/pepper/perfumy.

I like WLP500 for a Tripel and WLP570 for a BGSA. Speaking of, I need to make a Tripel here soon...
__________________
BJCP National Beer Judge
On deck: German Pilsner, CAP, Golden Strong
Fermenting: MOVING
Souring: #32 Lambic 2.0, #49 Lambic 3.0, #60 3763 Flanders Brown, #61 WLP665 Flanders Brown
Conditioning: #38 Golden Sour, #58 Hooch Cider, #79 Dopplebock, #84 Amy Cider
Drinkin': #16 Lambic 1.0 (Drunk Monk BOS), #84 Fall Cider
AmandaK is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 03:59 PM   #12
BudzAndSudz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Boulder, Co
Posts: 446
Liked 32 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 85

Default

I see you've got a BGSA fermenting as well as drinking. Would you mind posting the recipe? And I suppose if you wouldn't mind, I'd be curious to see what recipe you'd use for a Tripel as well, just to juxtapose the differences there.

__________________
BudzAndSudz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:03 PM   #13
barrooze
Feedback Score: 6 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Pearland, TX
Posts: 2,268
Liked 99 Times on 84 Posts
Likes Given: 123

Default

I've found the Chimay strain to be a little spicier than the Duval strain. For my Belgian strongs I enjoy 570.

__________________
Kegged: Flanders Blonde, Saison (WLP585), Saison (Belle Saison), Mid-ABV Janet's Brown, Texas Brown Ale (A.K.A. The Creature) Primary: Nothing Souring: Oaked Brett Blended Saison On Deck: Oktoberfest (ECY15) On the Horizon: Epic Pale ale clone, Tonguesplitter Updated: 2014/05/05
Untappd: barrooze
barrooze is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:19 PM   #14
MattHollingsworth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Samobor, Croatia
Posts: 1,612
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudzAndSudz View Post
Unfortunately, I really dislike that method, although I have done it in the past. I enjoy experiencing exactly what the yeasts can contribute to an ale, but I immensely dislike finding out which one is my favorite, and then wishing I had 10 more gallons of that, instead of two sub-par batches with the inferior yeast. I just did it with my Oktoberfest, and I was left with 10 gallons of excellent beer, and 5 gallons of beer that I wish was excellent. :/
As you were, then. I like seeing the differences and then selecting the best one for the next beer.
__________________
HOMEBREWING SINCE 1997
MattHollingsworth is offline
BudzAndSudz Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:22 PM   #15
BudzAndSudz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Boulder, Co
Posts: 446
Liked 32 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 85

Default

Although I suppose it might be worth a try here, since both Trippels and Golden Strongs are right up my alley, I suppose I'm much less likely to not enjoy one of the outcomes. My Oktoberfest experiment was 10 gallons with Lager yeast and 5 gallons with an Ale yeast. What I was left with was a weird, fruity, almost amber-ale that just tastes plain weird. At least with a belgian recipe where most of the flavor is from the yeast as opposed to the grain bill I guess I'd be less likely to see a weird outcome.

__________________
BudzAndSudz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:27 PM   #16
MattHollingsworth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Samobor, Croatia
Posts: 1,612
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudzAndSudz View Post
Although I suppose it might be worth a try here, since both Trippels and Golden Strongs are right up my alley, I suppose I'm much less likely to not enjoy one of the outcomes. My Oktoberfest experiment was 10 gallons with Lager yeast and 5 gallons with an Ale yeast. What I was left with was a weird, fruity, almost amber-ale that just tastes plain weird. At least with a belgian recipe where most of the flavor is from the yeast as opposed to the grain bill I guess I'd be less likely to see a weird outcome.
Yeah, I can see that. The yeasts I'm using this weekend are derived from Duvel, Westmalle and an unknown source in Ardennes (not Chouffe, it seems). I wanted to compare Duvel and Westmalle as I love Duvel and Westmalle's tripel and threw in the third yeast just for the hell of it.

With Belgian yeasts, I haven't really encountered one that I haven't liked. Some are better for certain purposes, but even then, sometimes they can be a surprise in another style.

That said, you're doing larger volumes than I am. I do 24 liters and split to 8 liters for each, around 22-24 bottles of 33 cl for each. Enough to sample and test the beer. I don't do this all the time, just doing it with some stuff lately. Took my existing amber ale that I've brewed a lot and did a batch with 1187, 1968 and 1469 just recently. Haven't tasted yet, but curious to see the differences with those. All of them should be great for an amber.
__________________
HOMEBREWING SINCE 1997
MattHollingsworth is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:43 PM   #17
BudzAndSudz
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Boulder, Co
Posts: 446
Liked 32 Times on 31 Posts
Likes Given: 85

Default

Yeah. Also if these didn't have a mandatory maturation time of a solid 3 months or so to really achieve the proper flavor I'd be more inclined. I wonder if it would be worth making a cheap extract version about 3 gallons in size to test out all the different flavors, drink it young, and then decide. That could work, but I suppose extract might not fully capture the flavor, since it'll contribute to the taste so differently than actual grains. I'm also really interested in WLP550. Sounds like a great option too.... Hmmmm

__________________
BudzAndSudz is offline
MattHollingsworth Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 04:56 PM   #18
MattHollingsworth
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Samobor, Croatia
Posts: 1,612
Liked 30 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 37

Default

I just used WY3522, same Achouffe source as 550, along with 3711 in a split batch Belgian IPA. Loved them both. 3711 ferments out totally, went down to .998, but still tastes awesome. 3522 ended at 1.009. Anyway, they're both lovely. Just bottled the beer, so will take more notes once it's conditioned.

WLP545 is also from Ardennes, but I have no idea what brewery it's from.

I have a backlog of beers already, so don't mind waiting out the conditioning. I have more than I can keep up with. And lots of mead as well. Good in case of zombie apocalypse. ;-)

__________________
HOMEBREWING SINCE 1997
MattHollingsworth is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 05:13 PM   #19
AmandaK
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: KCMO
Posts: 1,501
Liked 136 Times on 103 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudzAndSudz View Post
I see you've got a BGSA fermenting as well as drinking. Would you mind posting the recipe? And I suppose if you wouldn't mind, I'd be curious to see what recipe you'd use for a Tripel as well, just to juxtapose the differences there.
From memory (so it may be a bit off):

BGSA:
10 lb Belgian Pils
2.75 lb Cane Sugar
mash @ 151
83% eff.
3 oz. Czech Saaz @ 60
WLP570
ferment as follows:
64 start, ramp to 80 over 10 days. leave at 80 until FG is reached. cold condition for 3 weeks at 48 on cake. bottle.

Tripel (made this a long time ago):
11 lb Belgian Pils
2 lb Cane Sugar
mash @ 153*
70% eff
2 oz Czech Saaz @ 60
0.5 oz Saaz @ FO
WY1214 (or WLP500)
added a bit of coriander & orange peel at FO
ferment the same as above.

YMMV, but I hope that helps. Basically, the tripel is not as dry (FG 1.012 in my case compared to BGSA FG of 1.006) and the BGSA has a higher hopping rate. Personally, I like the BGSA better. But then again, I don't like cloves that much.
__________________
BJCP National Beer Judge
On deck: German Pilsner, CAP, Golden Strong
Fermenting: MOVING
Souring: #32 Lambic 2.0, #49 Lambic 3.0, #60 3763 Flanders Brown, #61 WLP665 Flanders Brown
Conditioning: #38 Golden Sour, #58 Hooch Cider, #79 Dopplebock, #84 Amy Cider
Drinkin': #16 Lambic 1.0 (Drunk Monk BOS), #84 Fall Cider
AmandaK is offline
BudzAndSudz Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-02-2012, 05:43 PM   #20
Wreckoncile
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA
Posts: 12
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BudzAndSudz View Post
Yeah. Also if these didn't have a mandatory maturation time of a solid 3 months or so to really achieve the proper flavor I'd be more inclined. I wonder if it would be worth making a cheap extract version about 3 gallons in size to test out all the different flavors, drink it young, and then decide. That could work, but I suppose extract might not fully capture the flavor, since it'll contribute to the taste so differently than actual grains. I'm also really interested in WLP550. Sounds like a great option too.... Hmmmm
Cheap extract? That's a bit of an oxymoron to me. Admittedly, I'm a newer brewer but after two extract batches, I made the move to BIAB AG just because grains are much cheaper than extract for getting gravity points. I'd say make a three gallon BIAB version test batch, bottle them all in 750s, and drink one once a week until gone to see how it develops and if you think it has potential for a full batch size.
__________________

Primary: Winterfell Black Stout
Secondary: None
Bottled: It's the Most Wonderful Time for a Beer Xmas Ale, Rumplepumpkin Imperial Pumpkin Porter, Walder Frey's Treacherous Smoked Mild.

Wreckoncile is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Belgian Dubbel - Belgian High Gravity yeast not starting pcarey1222 Fermentation & Yeast 9 11-13-2012 12:12 AM
Weyerman replacement for Belgian Pale and Belgian Pislner (Westvleteren 12) gugguson All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 07-01-2012 01:27 PM
Question about beer styles, Belgian Wheat vs Belgian Ale/Double/Triple etc Snoogles Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 02-10-2012 06:36 PM
Let's talk Belgian yeast for a tripel stevehollx Fermentation & Yeast 3 11-12-2011 06:16 PM
Recommendations for Wyeast 3522 Belgian Ardennes in Belgian Pale Ale? LeeF Recipes/Ingredients 3 03-29-2011 05:06 AM