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-   -   Lager yeast - stuck? Need advise (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/lager-yeast-stuck-need-advise-368097/)

mbz250sl 11-16-2012 03:07 AM

Lager yeast - stuck? Need advise
 
OK - first lager and I did more wrong than right - read multiple things on lagering and ended up pitching a liquid lager yeast at the same temp as my wort - roughly 40 degrees - no activity that i saw but quite a lot of sentiment after a week so to clean it moved from primary to secondary - don't ask why other than inexperience and impatient - still at 1.050 - got some advice to bring it to room temp and it finally took off - back in the fridge at 40 - been there a month and sitting at 1.035 - cloudy and wanted to clean it up so reracked to a clean carbon - when shaken i got some activity - back in the fridge under 40 - getting a little clearer but I'm concerned that still at 1.035 - would like to get your thoughts on where I stand and how to move forward - kinda know what I did wrong and don't mind you pointing it out as long as you share what I should have done

phatspade 11-16-2012 04:38 AM

Patience is key. Sounds like you shocked the yeast. Idk what to do besides bring to room temp again and slowly drop the temp back to the range the yeast needs if fermentation starts up again. Possibly repitch after racking if not.

g-star 11-16-2012 04:49 PM

I agree, you messed this up at almost every turn. Here's what you do next time if you want a successful lager:

1. Make sure you have enough healthy yeast to do the job. This means 4-6 tubes/packs of liquid yeast or a BIG starter (4L + with stirplate). Check Mr. Malty or yeastcalc.com to deterime the amount you need based on yeast production date, total batch volume, and predicted OG.

2. Pitch at about 45-48F. If you pitch enough yeast, fermentation will take off in 8-12 hours. Let the temperature rise naturally to 50F and hold it there until you are close to FG. It is important to have precise control over your fermentation temps...don't just put the carboy in a refrigerator. You need a controller.

3. Sample the beer after one week to check the gravity and test for diacetyl. If detected, warm the beer up to the low 60's for a few days to encourage diacteyl uptake by the remaining yeast in suspension.

4. After the beer hits FG, transfer to a secondary or keg and lager for the prescribed amount of time, usually 4-12 weeks or more.

Yooper 11-16-2012 05:00 PM

40 degrees is far too cold for fermentation- most lager yeast perform between 48 and 53 degrees. That's why it keeps stalling- it's being put to sleep at 40 degrees.

Bernie3761 12-08-2012 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by g-star (Post 4595673)
3. Sample the beer after one week to check the gravity and test for diacetyl. If detected, warm the beer up to the low 60's for a few days to encourage diacteyl uptake by the remaining yeast in suspension.

I am about to start my first lager and was wondering how to do a diacetyl test.

stixobutta 12-08-2012 03:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by g-star
I agree, you messed this up at almost every turn. Here's what you do next time if you want a successful lager:

1. Make sure you have enough healthy yeast to do the job. This means 4-6 tubes/packs of liquid yeast or a BIG starter (4L + with stirplate). Check Mr. Malty or yeastcalc.com to deterime the amount you need based on yeast production date, total batch volume, and predicted OG.

2. Pitch at about 45-48F. If you pitch enough yeast, fermentation will take off in 8-12 hours. Let the temperature rise naturally to 50F and hold it there until you are close to FG. It is important to have precise control over your fermentation temps...don't just put the carboy in a refrigerator. You need a controller.

3. Sample the beer after one week to check the gravity and test for diacetyl. If detected, warm the beer up to the low 60's for a few days to encourage diacteyl uptake by the remaining yeast in suspension.

4. After the beer hits FG, transfer to a secondary or keg and lager for the prescribed amount of time, usually 4-12 weeks or more.

+ 1

I agree, I just brewed a winter style lager last Sunday. Pitched a 3.5 liter starter at slightly above 55 and it took off within hours. 5 days in at 54 degrees and its already 75% done (1.070OG yesterday at 1.034, 1.018FG). I just turned the controller up a few degrees to do a diacetyl at around 64. Quickest lager to date for me. I attribute that to the large starter and spot on ferm temps.


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