New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Lager yeast starter time




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-20-2010, 10:16 PM   #1
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default Lager yeast starter time

I'm brewing the Bohemian Pilsner from BCS and it is my first lager and second time using a starter. With a 5.5gal batch size and OG of 1.056, the Mr. Malty calculator says I need a 2L starter using 2 vials of liquid lager yeast, which I did. I started my lager yeast yesterday at room temp and it is approaching 24hrs and has a lot of bubbling activity right now. BTW, I'm using a stir plate and flask.

I didn't really plan on a long starter time and my wort is sitting in the fridge. I'm a little concerned about contamination because I used an immersion chiller to chill to around 70F, then sealed up the kettle and threw it into the temp controlled freezer at 34F (to avoid any bacterial growth). I forgot about the no-chiller method, will have to do this next time.

I was planning on letting the starter go for 24 hours, then putting into the fridge to flocculate the yeast, decant after 24 hour chill time, then pitch the slurry to my wort. I'll raise the temperature of the fridge to 44F so both wort and starter will be at the same temperature.

So my questions are:

Is 24 hours enough time for a lager yeast starter to propagate before crash cooling? Is 24 hours enough chill time for flocculation?

If not, how do you tell when the starter is ready? The Mr. Malty starter FAQs say that you don't want to select the less flocculant yeast by crash cooling too early, but it doesn't say what are the signs to look for.

Will my wort be okay while my starter is doing its thing?

Thanks,
James



__________________

Last edited by JNish; 09-20-2010 at 10:20 PM.
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-20-2010, 11:14 PM   #2
Rundownhouse
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nashville
Posts: 323
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I don't have a stirplate, but isn't this essentially the same as doing a forced ferment? So you could take a hydrometer reading of your starter, and if its at terminal gravity, you can be confident that you've gotten all the cell growth you're going to get out of it.

No idea if 24h is long enough to get all that yeast to floc out. I typically crash my starters for days, both ale and lager.

You're already looking at 48h between sealing the kettle and pitching?



__________________
Rundownhouse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-21-2010, 07:12 PM   #3
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rundownhouse View Post
You're already looking at 48h between sealing the kettle and pitching?
Yes, I'm looking at 48hr after boil to pitch the yeast.

I ended up waiting until bubbling subsided in my starter, then moved to the fridge. That ended up being about 28 hours in the starter. I'll wait 24 hours, decant, then pitch the slurry. I'm thinking of saving the starter wort, letting that settle, and pitch it later if there's anything left.
__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-21-2010, 07:20 PM   #4
Pivovar_Koucky
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 399
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JNish View Post
Yes, I'm looking at 48hr after boil to pitch the yeast.

I ended up waiting until bubbling subsided in my starter, then moved to the fridge. That ended up being about 28 hours in the starter. I'll wait 24 hours, decant, then pitch the slurry. I'm thinking of saving the starter wort, letting that settle, and pitch it later if there's anything left.
I would think that is fine. In the future make your starter 2-3 days in advance so you don't have to worry about this.
__________________
Pivovar_Koucky is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-21-2010, 09:31 PM   #5
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pivovar_Koucky View Post
In the future make your starter 2-3 days in advance so you don't have to worry about this.
Yup I will.

I was initially thinking that by the time my wort cooled to pitching temp (44F as recommended by BCS), my starter would be ready. Of course, I didn't thing that I would want to flocculate the yeast instead of pitching the entire starter, which I've done with a stout before. I figured with a pilsner I would want to avoid any off-flavors from the starter wort. Is this typical or have you pitched starters with lagers?
__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-21-2010, 10:38 PM   #6
Rundownhouse
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Nashville
Posts: 323
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I brew 12g batches, 11g into the fermenters, starting from one vial/pack. My lager starters typically end up being 2.5-3g, so I always decant.



__________________
Rundownhouse is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lager yeast starter jmancuso Fermentation & Yeast 7 07-27-2010 01:38 AM
Lager yeast starter question oooFishy Fermentation & Yeast 4 05-16-2010 05:48 PM
Help me make my first lager...need help with yeast starter jangelj Fermentation & Yeast 7 05-12-2010 03:50 AM
Yeast Starter for Lager JohnnyO Fermentation & Yeast 5 03-12-2010 04:06 PM
Lager yeast starter question chefkdub Fermentation & Yeast 4 09-05-2009 09:14 PM