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Old 07-04-2012, 01:16 AM   #1
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Default Irish Red question

Brewed my first Irish Red yesterday and fermentation has taken off nicely. My question: is 63F-65F a suitable fermentation temp? I did some reading that stated that some brewers use lager yeast. Also, with an Irish Red is there much of a secondary fermentation time or aging? Thanks

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Old 07-04-2012, 01:33 AM   #2
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According to Jamil and Chris Whites book "Yeast", they say the most optimal temp is 68, and that its best to start at 65 for first 3 days since the fermentation process is most agressive during that time since the fermentation creates excessive heat during the multiplication phase. Starting at 65 should offset that heat generation. Then increase to 68 for most of the fermentation. Then finally, bump to 75+ for last 10-20% of fermentation. They mention that most of the fusel alchohols and off flavors are made during first stage of fermentation, at the end you are just trying to keep the yeast going and maximise attenuation.

The book describes that its best to judge your fermentation by gravity readings and not by the number of days. After the gravity has finished decreasing, the fermentation should be left for a few days to let the yeast clean up some of the residue fusel alchohols.

In my personal opinion, If that temp is the temp of your coldroom or whatever, I would just leave it to ferment at that temp until you are at about 80% of your final gravity. Then move the fermenter up to your main floor where it is warmer to finish fermentation to maximize attenuation.

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Old 07-04-2012, 01:35 AM   #3
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It totally depends on your yeast strain. That's how you determine fermentation temperature. What was the yeast strain used?

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Old 07-04-2012, 01:48 AM   #4
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It totally depends on your yeast strain. That's how you determine fermentation temperature. What was the yeast strain used?
WLP004 "Irish Ale" I use that for my Irish stout as well and does a real nice job. I had read that in Irish Reds that you want no traces of esters...how important is this really? This is why I asked the question about temp. and about some brewers using lager yeast...
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:52 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by ODI3 View Post
According to Jamil and Chris Whites book "Yeast", they say the most optimal temp is 68, and that its best to start at 65 for first 3 days since the fermentation process is most agressive during that time since the fermentation creates excessive heat during the multiplication phase. Starting at 65 should offset that heat generation. Then increase to 68 for most of the fermentation. Then finally, bump to 75+ for last 10-20% of fermentation. They mention that most of the fusel alchohols and off flavors are made during first stage of fermentation, at the end you are just trying to keep the yeast going and maximise attenuation.

The book describes that its best to judge your fermentation by gravity readings and not by the number of days. After the gravity has finished decreasing, the fermentation should be left for a few days to let the yeast clean up some of the residue fusel alchohols.

In my personal opinion, If that temp is the temp of your coldroom or whatever, I would just leave it to ferment at that temp until you are at about 80% of your final gravity. Then move the fermenter up to your main floor where it is warmer to finish fermentation to maximize attenuation.
This is a nice break down. I have a good grip on the fermentation process but had just heard a couple interesting things about Irish Reds, like the fact that they should have no traces of esters. That some brewers use lager yeast, and so I was just curious if that was a suitable temp for that style. All of my other styles come out great starting out at around 65F. I have to keep them in a cold bath and they ferment strong at around 68F-70F, but like I said I was just not sure with the Red since I had heard different things about temps and such. Thanks
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Old 07-04-2012, 01:55 AM   #6
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WLP004 "Irish Ale" I use that for my Irish stout as well and does a real nice job. I had read that in Irish Reds that you want no traces of esters...how important is this really? This is why I asked the question about temp. and about some brewers using lager yeast...
I like that yeast strain right at 64-65 degrees, so I think you're good. Any higher and it starts getting estery. I would suggest bringing it up to 70 degrees when the beer is nearly finished (maybe day 4) to help clean up the diacetyl as that strain does seem to produce diaceytl, at least for me.
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Old 07-04-2012, 02:03 AM   #7
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I like that yeast strain right at 64-65 degrees, so I think you're good. Any higher and it starts getting estery. I would suggest bringing it up to 70 degrees when the beer is nearly finished (maybe day 4) to help clean up the diacetyl as that strain does seem to produce diaceytl, at least for me.
Sounds good, thanks.
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