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Old 05-16-2011, 06:02 PM   #181
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>.According to the new yeast book, yes. They recommend at least 60 seconds at pitch and again at the 12-18 hour mark. 90 seconds at each point wouldn't be off at all. Apparently, that second shot at the 12-18 hour mark is more important than a larger saturation at pitch.


OK, I am really interested now. I think I will buy the O2 system at some point and try a 3 batch test.

Boil the wort (a 1.055 or higher SG), Pitch the yeast, stir it in to make sure its uniformly distrubuted. (Or should I pitch the yeast after oxygenation, into the 3 buckets, how do I control the exact amount of yeast pitched?)
Use 3 buckets:

#1: O2 for 60 seconds, and at 12 hours another 60 seconds O2 (hope there is no infection introduced by this, the wort will be exposed for 120 seconds.

#2: O2 for 60 seconds

#3: the shake for 45 seconds method, maybe with a strainer bag as well.


Then see if there is a difference in taste. If there is a noticeable improvement, as opposed to "Hmm, I think, maybe sort of, #3 doesn't quite taste as good as the others" its a success. What I am hoping is #1 will taste noticeably better.

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Old 05-16-2011, 08:12 PM   #182
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Quote:
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What I am hoping is #1 will taste noticeably better.
Why? Do you own stock in some bottled gas company?

I'm hoping #3 is the best so I don't have to buy anything else...
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Old 05-16-2011, 08:32 PM   #183
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Originally Posted by ArcLight View Post
>.According to the new yeast book, yes. They recommend at least 60 seconds at pitch and again at the 12-18 hour mark. 90 seconds at each point wouldn't be off at all. Apparently, that second shot at the 12-18 hour mark is more important than a larger saturation at pitch.


OK, I am really interested now. I think I will buy the O2 system at some point and try a 3 batch test.

Boil the wort (a 1.055 or higher SG), Pitch the yeast, stir it in to make sure its uniformly distrubuted. (Or should I pitch the yeast after oxygenation, into the 3 buckets, how do I control the exact amount of yeast pitched?)
Use 3 buckets:

#1: O2 for 60 seconds, and at 12 hours another 60 seconds O2 (hope there is no infection introduced by this, the wort will be exposed for 120 seconds.

#2: O2 for 60 seconds

#3: the shake for 45 seconds method, maybe with a strainer bag as well.


Then see if there is a difference in taste. If there is a noticeable improvement, as opposed to "Hmm, I think, maybe sort of, #3 doesn't quite taste as good as the others" its a success. What I am hoping is #1 will taste noticeably better.
3 dried (1 each batch) packets of yeast from the same production date would prob be the easiest control I would think
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Old 05-17-2011, 10:46 AM   #184
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>>3 dried (1 each batch) packets of yeast from the same production date would prob be the easiest control I would think

But wont they taste worse than the liquid yeast? OR are there some very good dried packs?

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Old 05-17-2011, 12:11 PM   #185
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>>3 dried (1 each batch) packets of yeast from the same production date would prob be the easiest control I would think

But wont they taste worse than the liquid yeast? OR are there some very good dried packs?
There are SOME dried yeasts these days which are, in all likelihood, just as good as the liquid yeasts. I haven't seen a ton of actual science to that effect, but the anecdotal evidence is incredibly strong. Even if they turned out to be not quite as good, at worst they are still very close, and dried yeasts have definitely improved immensely in the last few decades. The big problem with dry yeasts in modern homebrewing has more to do with the variety than anything else.... there simply isn't anywhere near the depth of strain selection that you get with liquid yeasts.

For the record, I use liquid yeast for primary fermentation in all my beers, and only use dry yeast if I need to use a second (or third) yeast for whatever reason, whether it's to further dry a beer out, if I feel like it needs a dose of healthy yeast for bottle carbing, etc.
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Old 05-17-2011, 02:32 PM   #186
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>>3 dried (1 each batch) packets of yeast from the same production date would prob be the easiest control I would think

But wont they taste worse than the liquid yeast? OR are there some very good dried packs?
I now use S-05 for everything where I'd use Wyeast 1056. I can discern no difference*, and the S-05 is cheaper and more convenient to use. Pretty much the same with Nottingham in any British ale. I will of course use something like the Weihenstephan liquid yeast in a Hefeweizen, or the proper Belgian yeast in those styles, as equivalent dry yeasts simply don't exist.

*I have no problem that YOU may be able to tell a difference among the yeasts mentioned- but I can't, my beer, etc. YMMV, do what you please.
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Old 05-17-2011, 06:08 PM   #187
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US-05 / 1056 / wlp001 are all the Chico(Sierra Nevada) strain

i guess a potential issue with using dry is that dry yeast don't have the same oxygen requirements that liquid does according to Danstar

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Old 05-17-2011, 06:28 PM   #188
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US-05 / 1056 / wlp001 are all the Chico(Sierra Nevada) strain

i guess a potential issue with using dry is that dry yeast don't have the same oxygen requirements that liquid does according to Danstar
Huge issue. In fact, they say that oxygenation/aeration is unnecessary but won't do any harm to their dry yeasts.
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Old 05-26-2011, 01:37 PM   #189
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That is the answer I was looking for. Oxygenated wort allows growth of vast numbers of yeast , the bubbles created being carbon dioxide. That's the aerobic respiratory phase of the process. When the Oxygen is depleted the yeasties go into anaerobic respiration. That's when the alcohol is produced, during anaerobic. The 1.020 bug mentioned by kpr121 was most probably because of a low population of yeast not able to consume the sugars in the wort. I highly recommend all brewers purchase "Brew Chem 101" by Lee Janson. Google it up. It is a detailed chemistry lesson on home brewing including off flavors and how they get into beer and how to keep them out.
Thanks for the replies.

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Old 05-26-2011, 02:48 PM   #190
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Anybody tracking the olive oil experiments going on over at probrewer? Apparently a couple of guys are using olive oil and dried egg yolk as sources of oleic acid. This process allows some brewers to bypass the oxygenation of their wort. It's worth a read.

http://www.probrewer.com/vbulletin/s...ad.php?t=17419

-sorry for threadjack

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