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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > I am wondering if anyone washes yeast with this method...
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:21 AM   #41
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You should use sterile water...you're introducing a bunch of contaminants in the washing process as it is. The best method would be to pressure cook a few jars of clean water, that way you have sterile water and jars.

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Old 08-08-2013, 06:30 AM   #42
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one guy I seen took his whole bucket/carboy, added sterilized water(that has been boiled and cooled) to the whole yeast cake, let it stratify and then pour it into one jar. It's one way to do it

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Old 08-26-2013, 08:35 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
I prefer harvesting (and freezing) some vials of yeast from 2L starters made from a fresh, new yeast purchase. I'll end up with 2-4 extra vials which will be good for 2-4 future starters. But this is primarily because I don't brew more than twice a month.

If I brewed more often, I could certainly see dealing with washing yeast and reusing in short order.
I'm with Weezy.. to me it doesn't make much sense to use the yeast in your beer and then have to wash it once it is a generation older. I just make a starter bigger then I need and I fill up a vial with part of it. That way it's like I didn't even use the vial I'd bought
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Old 08-26-2013, 09:52 PM   #44
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Yeast can improve performance in successive generations.

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Old 08-27-2013, 01:10 AM   #45
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Yeast can improve performance in successive generations.
I've read this is widely agreed upon for a particular sour blend, maybe the Roeselare blend. I wouldn't be surprised if this was true of other yeast as well, particular some Belgian and German strains where stressing the yeast can help bring out the more expressive qualities. Additionally, for high gravity beers I might want use a very large pitch but not have to deal with a large starter so racking onto a yeast cake or a portion of a yeast cake is most convenient.
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Old 08-27-2013, 02:28 AM   #46
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a lot of no-so-good advice in here (and some good stuff too, to be fair)

listen to Jamil and John Palmer's podcast on yeast washing and storage. It will answer every question in this thread

http://www.thebrewingnetwork.com/shows/543

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Old 08-27-2013, 07:17 AM   #47
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Or read his book, Yeast

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Old 08-27-2013, 10:24 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bzwyatt View Post
Yeast can improve performance in successive generations.
Understood but this isn't really the point. We're talking about the mechanics of yeast harvesting. It's about what purpose the yeast harvesting is serving. I see three cases (there may surely be more, like a plating and a real yeast bank, but these are easy, common, homebrewer methods):
1. brewing a small beer so that you can build up a nice yeast cake for a big beer,
2. washing the post fermentation yeast for repitching in future batches.
3. collecting small portions of yeast harvest from new starters for freezing.

#2 is beneficial to those who brew often and large jars of yeast kept in the fridge won't just go bad from non-use. The downside to #2 is that the longevity of the yeast is directly dependent on the quality of the wash job. And it's a fair bit more work than #3.

#3 is great for people like me who like to keep a couple yeast strains around for months, for the occasional brew session and to save a few bucks. for example, I have a saison strain that I'll use 2-3 times a year, and when the slants are gone I buy a new tube. It's very easy to pull a small portion of yeast, with minimal cleaning effort, from a fresh starter for freezing, then just dump the rest of the starter yeast into the fermenter for the current brew session. I really only need to buy one tube of the few strains I use each year, brewing once or occasionally twice a month.


No disrespect to JZ (cuz I've certainly learned a lot from him and I will be buying the book), but to those of us who listen to the BN, don't you ever get the impression that their ideas are *very* west coast centric. They drone on and on about dry beer and attenuation being king. JZ probably sneezes chico strain. JZ flatly even said he didn't have any really good east coast beer from his recent trip (NHC). East coast beer is generally sweeter than west coast beer. The yalso have a half hearted grudge against midwest and east coast breweries evident whenever top beer lists are brought up, etc. Somehow sweet beer is under attenuation or poor recipe development. A good example of the differentiation is the last Session podcast, with Summit Brewing out of Minnesota. The brewer guest (Damian McConn, classically trained in the UK) had a very nice discussion regarding the benefits of different types of malts, how US malts are highly enzymatic, the benefits of less attenuating and estery yeast, and the delicateness and difficulty of obtaining a quality residual maltiness/sweetness in a beer, especially in the smaller beers common in other parts of the world. There's more than one way to skin a cat and all are correct in their own way and for their own reasons...just like what we're talking about here with yeast washing.
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Old 09-06-2013, 02:33 AM   #49
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off topic but had to reply. i listen to the BN regularly, and you nailed it weezy. I thought the summit interview was awesome, I am going to listen to it again and try a few of his pointers. one of the brewcasters that seems to not be so much on the dry dry dry bandwagon is tasty!

on the yeast washing, the last few batches of beer we did were all done from the same harvest. we harvested the yeast out of a fresh batch of blonde ale, stored it in a sanitized jar, and just added roughly 80ml of slurry to a 1.5 liter stirred starter. beers turned out good, so it seemed to work well.

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Old 09-06-2013, 08:58 PM   #50
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Back to the OP's question. Have you seen this thread? http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/yea...isited-318684/

Down a ways he says "+ You can use jars, tubes, & vials as small as you can get with an extra step of decanting, but leaving a slight bit of water to swirl the yeast around."

So an idea for using less fridge space would be to decant the yeast one more time into smaller jars (some people use 4 oz jelly jars or the preform vials) and store those. This might be better than pouring them all into one container.

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