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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > I am actually going to purchase a yeast strain English Strain Reccomendations/Advice
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Old 10-04-2010, 02:50 PM   #1
permo
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Default I am actually going to purchase a yeast strain English Strain Reccomendations/Advice

I have a pretty nice stash of yeast available for my brewing:

Pacman
WLP001
WLP500
Bells Yeast
WLP029
Hoeegarden



I think WLP001, Pacman and Bells are pretty interchangeable as far as fermentation characteristics and flavor profile are concerned. My other strains are specialty strains with unique flavors and capabilities. I have come to crave an English strain to add to my arsenal. I want to make IPA's, Pale Ale's Etc...sometimes with a little ester profile from english yeast. I am a white labs fan, so here is the strains I am considering:

WLP002 English Ale Yeast ( worried about underattenution with this strain)
WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast (this looks to be the leader, with high attenuation and high floc)
WLP005 Brittish Ale
WLP006 Bedford Brittish


I would also like other reccomendation for a strain, I am primarily trying to create more "intersting" hoppy/big beers with this strain.

thx!

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Old 10-04-2010, 02:52 PM   #2
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007/S-04 is a beast!

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Old 10-04-2010, 02:57 PM   #3
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007/S-04 is a beast!
That is kind of what I thought......

I have used nottingham dry yeast many times...I am hoping WLP007 is not even close to that...notty is so neutral.

Also, do you think if I mashed high enough I could make a propper bitter with this strain or is it just too attenuative?
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Old 10-04-2010, 03:07 PM   #4
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I think mashing high enough would give you a nice bitter, if it still feels "thin" when you're done you can always add maltodextrine before bottling/kegging until you get the right mash temp.

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Old 10-04-2010, 03:10 PM   #5
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WLP007 is my favorite ale yeast. I use it in everything. It gets my vote for sure.

Finishes out dry, floccs out wonderfully, somewhat estery profile without dominating the beer... love it.

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Old 10-04-2010, 03:11 PM   #6
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I adore WLP002... I love its flocculation. I can make a 1.060 beer and still have it kegged and carbed 8-10 days after brewing. Just make sure to ramp up your temps as fermentation slows to clean up the diacetyl.

It leaves a tad extra sweetness to your beers which I enjoy, but for some styles I'll counter the sweetness by either uping the bitterness, or adding 3-5% table sugar.

Its malty, estery, ALEish flavors and aromas are incredible. People who drink these beers are blasted away by how flavorful they are. And don't think that this yeast is only for malty styles - it makes great hoppy beers too if you enjoy malty flavors alongside the hops.

This yeast really takes your grain bill and amps up all the malt flavors - every little grain addition you put in your wort is present in the final product.

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Old 10-04-2010, 03:28 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanzimonson View Post
I adore WLP002... I love its flocculation. I can make a 1.060 beer and still have it kegged and carbed 8-10 days after brewing. Just make sure to ramp up your temps as fermentation slows to clean up the diacetyl.

It leaves a tad extra sweetness to your beers which I enjoy, but for some styles I'll counter the sweetness by either uping the bitterness, or adding 3-5% table sugar.

Its malty, estery, ALEish flavors and aromas are incredible. People who drink these beers are blasted away by how flavorful they are. And don't think that this yeast is only for malty styles - it makes great hoppy beers too if you enjoy malty flavors alongside the hops.

This yeast really takes your grain bill and amps up all the malt flavors - every little grain addition you put in your wort is present in the final product.
If you manipulate your mash conditions can you get WLP002 to take a 1.065 IPA down to 1.015 or lower without adding sugar?
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Old 10-04-2010, 03:41 PM   #8
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I bet it's possible but could take some finesse. You'd probably have to mash belgian style - 149* for 60 minutes, then up to 152-154 for 15min. Maybe even do 149 for 30min, then 152 for 20, then back down to 149 for 15. The raise and lower would help to gelatinize all the starch and maximally utilize all your enzymes.

I just made a brown ale with a fair bit of specialty grains that went from 1.060 to 1.020 in six days or less. Mashed at 155 for an hour, and this beer had 12.3% total specialty grains - 9.7% crystal 80, 2.4% chocolate, .2% black. So I don't think it would be a huge stretch

But is there any reason you're opposed to adding a touch of sugar? The above-mentioned mash schedule, plus 3% sugar would probably get your FG no problem.

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Old 10-04-2010, 03:44 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kanzimonson View Post
I bet it's possible but could take some finesse. You'd probably have to mash belgian style - 149* for 60 minutes, then up to 152-154 for 15min. Maybe even do 149 for 30min, then 152 for 20, then back down to 149 for 15. The raise and lower would help to gelatinize all the starch and maximally utilize all your enzymes.

I just made a brown ale with a fair bit of specialty grains that went from 1.060 to 1.020 in six days or less. Mashed at 155 for an hour, and this beer had 12.3% total specialty grains - 9.7% crystal 80, 2.4% chocolate, .2% black. So I don't think it would be a huge stretch

But is there any reason you're opposed to adding a touch of sugar? The above-mentioned mash schedule, plus 3% sugar would probably get your FG no problem.
I have no issues adding sugar, I am just trying to get a feel for the performance of the yeast. I actually prefer my IPA's to have that crisp dryness that comes from sugar.
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Old 10-04-2010, 03:55 PM   #10
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Can you brew a 10 gallon batch? If so, do a yeast battle...pitch 002 into one carboy and 007 into another. See which one you prefer.

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