Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > How long can a yeast cake stay alive...
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-05-2013, 05:58 PM   #1
BrewOnBoard
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 202
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default How long can a yeast cake stay alive...

I was planning on bottling my current batch today and brewing batch two and dumping it on the yeast cake. I've never done this before and wanted to try the technique, but my current batch is still bubbling 6/minute and doesn't look done.

(no I didn't check the OG I brew in a hydrometer free zone )

If I bottle my brew some time this week and have a naked yeast cake in the fermenter, how long will it live? I'm not interested in washing the yeast (great how to article though). Should I add some water so it doesn't dry out?

How long before they all die?

BrewOnBoard

__________________
BrewOnBoard is offline
ajf Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-05-2013, 06:46 PM   #2
leftcoastbrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 27
Likes Given: 16

Default

that's a great question: i was planning on doing this on thursday & just assumed i was going to have to use it immediately..... i'll call the guys at the LHBS and will let you know what they say since they do it all the time over there....

__________________

_________________________
Past Brews:Drum Solo ESB, Scottish Heavy, Honeysuckle Rose Ale, Imperial Red Rye, Nut Brown Ale, Hoppy Red Ale II, IPA, Imperial Rye Oatmeal Stout, Kitchen Sink IPA, some kind of stout, BP Home Work Series Red Ale, Decoction Hefe, Just Duet IPA, Hard Cider, Scottish Heavy II, Pumpkin Jack Ale
Fermenting: english IPA, pale ale, pb stout

leftcoastbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-05-2013, 07:24 PM   #3
LegitBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 62
Liked 18 Times on 7 Posts

Default

I wash my yeast, but I've let the cake sit a couple of days before with no problems. No idea how long it would be viable, but I would guess you'd be fine within a week. I leave an inch or so of beer on top of the cake and just seal it back up.

__________________
LegitBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 03:52 AM   #4
BrewOnBoard
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 202
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LegitBrew View Post
I wash my yeast, but I've let the cake sit a couple of days before with no problems. No idea how long it would be viable, but I would guess you'd be fine within a week. I leave an inch or so of beer on top of the cake and just seal it back up.
NO! We can't leave a man behind! Oh, wait, I think that was something different I was thinking about....

Yes, leaving a little bit of beer sounds like a good idea!

BrewOnBoard
__________________
BrewOnBoard is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 03:56 AM   #5
Matteo57
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Corona, ca
Posts: 738
Liked 17 Times on 16 Posts

Default

Wondering the same thing

__________________
Matteo57 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 05:03 AM   #6
el_caro
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: , Australia
Posts: 606
Liked 33 Times on 28 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

You do not need to do the full washing procedure. Just pour it into a sanitised bottle, close it up and put it in the fridge. That will help preservation by reducing exposure to oxygen, lowering temperature and perhaps even reducing likelihood of infection.

__________________
el_caro is offline
naga77777 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 05:36 PM   #7
naga77777
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Oxford, NC
Posts: 440
Liked 53 Times on 45 Posts
Likes Given: 646

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by el_caro View Post
You do not need to do the full washing procedure. Just pour it into a sanitised bottle, close it up and put it in the fridge. That will help preservation by reducing exposure to oxygen, lowering temperature and perhaps even reducing likelihood of infection.
I was gonna say just that.

The first time I used wyeast 1056, I didn't really like the flavor. I reused the trub for 2 or 3 batches before I actually tasted the first one.

Well, the last batch I made with it, I just poured a pint's worth of trub into a star-san'd pint jar and stuck it in the fridge.

Flash forward probably 3 weeks later, and I decided to do a Graff. Warmed up the pint jar to room temp, and tossed it in there. Airlock was bubbling within the hour. Them yeasties was HUNGRY!
__________________
Brewing Since July 2012 All-grain BIAB
Primary 1: Raging Irish Red
Primary 2: Lilsparky's Nut Brown Ale
Secondary 1: Skeeter Pee
Secondary 2: Air
Kegged: Two Hearted Clone, Graff, BM Centennial Blonde (again :) )
naga77777 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2013, 05:47 PM   #8
landshark
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
landshark's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: lone jack, Missouri
Posts: 1,095
Liked 94 Times on 79 Posts
Likes Given: 26

Default

I've personally put a batch on a yeast cake that had been sitting for 2 1/2 weeks. Still worked. Yeasties are hard to kill. Really, they are. The issue that you will be looking at in waiting that long or longer will be if something unfavorable gets into the cake as well and picking up an infection. However, I just keep everything wrapped up and sealed and have not had a problem. Maybe I'm just lucky.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by TxBrew View Post
If you want to know what weird is, ask yourself "Is this weird?" and if you just asked yourself that question it is.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laughing_Gnome_Invisible View Post
OK, So I searched "Betty White nude" ...........At the top of the results, instead of 'Did you mean......" it asked "Are you f#cking serious?....."
landshark is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-24-2013, 02:36 PM   #9
squeekybobo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 240
Liked 18 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by landshark View Post
I've personally put a batch on a yeast cake that had been sitting for 2 1/2 weeks. Still worked. Yeasties are hard to kill. Really, they are. The issue that you will be looking at in waiting that long or longer will be if something unfavorable gets into the cake as well and picking up an infection. However, I just keep everything wrapped up and sealed and have not had a problem. Maybe I'm just lucky.
Planning on doing just that this weekend. Have a yeast cake that's been in the sealed fermenter under a couple inches of beer for almost 2 weeks now. I also planning on doing a pretty big beer (1.096), so the pitch rate should be good. Maybe a little overkill, but not underpitched. Blowoff tube will be a must.

Question: Should I decant the 2 inches of beer on top first? I'm inclined to do so. The yeast cake was from a pale ale, planning on brewing a big IIPA.
__________________
squeekybobo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-24-2013, 03:08 PM   #10
DPBISME
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Alexandria, VA
Posts: 993
Liked 69 Times on 56 Posts
Likes Given: 76

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by landshark View Post
"...if something unfavorable gets into the cake...
I am with this guy...

If you do this in your house, with no wind blowing dust around that could carry "Little Beasties" you should be fine.

Personally I am starting to think it is really HARD to infect a beer.

13 years of major screws up and I have only had a couple even start to "go "south".

My latest goof was three weeks ago.

I have a three tiered system that I store outside under the deck, Keggles and all.

I brewed three days in a row and on the third day I was filling the Hot Water Tank while the Wort was being chilled, it overflowed and the water flowed down the sides and some of it in my beer. (Not the first time for this BONEHEADED MOVE.

So far I have not had a batch get infected...

So keeping the "air" off the yeast seems a good idea to make sure it does not dry out or oxidize... Beer or some cooled boiled water...

ELSE as suggested Scoop some in to a jar and refridgerate.

DPB
__________________
DPBISME is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How long washed yeast stay alive after racking? Lagger Fermentation & Yeast 1 05-02-2013 05:28 AM
How long does liquid yeast stay viable for use? Phipcice General Chit Chat 2 11-03-2012 08:43 PM
How long does a yeast cake stay fresh and good? velorider11 Fermentation & Yeast 4 09-19-2012 10:43 PM
how long can yeast stay in carboy after racking? SATXbrew Fermentation & Yeast 2 06-17-2012 03:55 PM
How long will a yeast starter stay viable? southpawbrew Fermentation & Yeast 4 02-16-2010 01:45 AM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS