New Giveaway - Wort Monster Conical Fermenter!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > House Yeast Strains




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-21-2013, 02:57 AM   #11
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Conroe, TX
Posts: 695
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
How does Nottingham do?
I use Nottingham when I want extremely dry and/or extremely clean beers. It usually flocs out really well also.

The reason I use it so much is it works great in lager-style beers where a clean profile is ideal, but it can also be used at higher temps for a lot of other applications. I'm currently fermenting a Rauchbier that I pitched at 52F and it's chugging along nicely at 57F. Try doing that w/ many other ale strains!


__________________
CharlosCarlies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 02:58 AM   #12
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Conroe, TX
Posts: 695
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Quote:
I liked the WLP 001 I've been using. Isn't that the same strain as US-05?
For the most part, yes. They aren't identical but it's really really really close IMO.


__________________
CharlosCarlies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 03:02 AM   #13
Stauffbier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
Stauffbier's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: El Paso, TX
Posts: 5,043
Liked 974 Times on 604 Posts
Likes Given: 2619

Default

I use US 05 more than any other yeast. I have a tendancy to brew on a whim, and it's nice to just pull a pack out of the fridge instead of having to build a starter in advance. I do still use a lot of liquid yeast, though.

__________________
Bier war sein letztes wort dann trugen ihn die Englein fort...

Stauffbier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 03:12 AM   #14
CharlosCarlies
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CharlosCarlies's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Conroe, TX
Posts: 695
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

Agreed. US-05 is great to have around as a last minute yeast.

__________________
CharlosCarlies is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 11:14 AM   #15
Grantman1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 351
Liked 35 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

I've been using WLP013 for English style beers lately, and been loving it. It's pretty versatile as well.

__________________
Grantman1 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 09:44 PM   #16
EDS2K
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Laporte, Indiana
Posts: 32
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by alane1 View Post
I mostly use WLP002 but have some 005 what are the major differences?
From the makers themselves:

WLP002 English Ale Yeast
A classic ESB strain from one of England's largest independent breweries. This yeast is best suited for English style ales including milds, bitters, porters, and English style stouts. This yeast will leave a beer very clear, and will leave some residual sweetness.
Attenuation: 63-70%
Flocculation: Very High
Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 65-68°F
Alcohol Tolerance: Medium


WLP005 British Ale Yeast
This yeast is a little more attenuative than WLP002. Like most English strains, this yeast produces malty beers. Excellent for all English style ales including bitter, pale ale, porter, and brown ale.
Attenuation: 67-74%
Flocculation: High
Optimum fermentation temperature: 65-70°F
Alcohol Tolerance: Medium


WLP007 Dry English Ale Yeast
Clean, highly flocculent, and highly attenuative yeast. This yeast is similar to WLP002 in flavor profile, but is 10% more attenuative. This eliminates the residual sweetness, and makes the yeast well suited for high gravity ales. It is also reaches terminal gravity quickly. 80% attenuation will be reached even with 10% ABV beers.
Attenuation: 70-80%
Flocculation: Medium to High
Optimum fermentation temperature: 65-70°F
Alcohol Tolerance: Medium-High
__________________
EDS2K is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-21-2013, 09:54 PM   #17
EDS2K
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Laporte, Indiana
Posts: 32
Default

Another thought. Since you can get WLP002, 005 and 007 at anytime, a good one to pick up for harvesting and keeping is WLP006 Bedford. It is only available July/August, so keeping some back allows you to have "strawberries in winter". I have really liked the "session" beers I have made from this strain. Here are WL's notes:

WLP006 Bedford British
Ferments dry and flocculates very well. Produces a distinctive ester profile. Good choice for most English style ales including bitter, pale ale, porter, and brown ale.
Attenuation: 72-80%
Flocculation: High
Optimum fermentation temperature: 65-70°F
Alcohol Tolerance: Medium

__________________
EDS2K is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2013, 02:51 PM   #18
rodwha
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 2,190
Liked 70 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Can anyone comment on Wyeast's 1010 vs White Labs WLP 320?
Another strain that isn't banana-like?
Most wheat beers will become a honey wheat, though I'm trying a cherry wheat for SWMBO soon.

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

"Were I to leave where else would I go? Your words of life and of truth You hold." - Third Day
rodwha is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2013, 03:35 PM   #19
rodwha
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 2,190
Liked 70 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

I'm considering a Belgian yeast as well, but I know I don't like the bubblegum taste.
I liked Rince Cochon blonde, and Blue Moon is OK, as well as some sort of golden strong ale.
If I wanted one Belgian yeast strain for a wit, blonde, strong ale, dubbed/trippel what would I want to consider if I don't like the bubblegum taste?

__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

"Were I to leave where else would I go? Your words of life and of truth You hold." - Third Day
rodwha is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-22-2013, 04:35 PM   #20
rodwha
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 2,190
Liked 70 Times on 66 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Here are the strains I'm mostly considering, though I'm still open to recommendations. What I'm looking for is a 63-66* fermentation with high flocculation in all except the wheat of course.

I want an American high attenuation yeast for beers such as IPA's, IIPA's, barleywine, pales, etc. For this I am leaning towards going back with WLP 001, but am still considering US-05, WLP 090, and 1056.

For other American beers such as blondes, ambers, pales w/ lower IBU's, browns, porters, stouts, etc. I'm leaning towards 1332 and considering WLP 051.

For American wheats I'm leaning towards 1010 to try something different, especially since it has higher attenuation.

And for British styled beers I am not so certain. If I were to need to make a decision I'd probably choose WLP 005, but I'm considering WLP 002, WLP 006, US-04, 1099, 1318, and 1335. I'd mostly want this for ESB's, but I'd try pales, browns, barleywine, IPA's, porters, stouts, Irish red, and Scotish if I can.

And I think I'll leave the Belgian strains alone.



__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
...tasting a beer at 1 week, and again at 2....that to me just means there 2 less beers that are actually tasting good and are ready at the end.
"Anyway on the wall was this sign. People who drink light beer don't really like beer. They just like to piss a lot."

"Were I to leave where else would I go? Your words of life and of truth You hold." - Third Day
rodwha is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
House Yeast Strains?? Do you have any?? hbhudy Fermentation & Yeast 23 12-04-2012 07:50 PM
What are good alternative 'House Strains" besides 1056/001/S-05? fastricky Fermentation & Yeast 41 08-08-2011 10:25 PM
House yeast strains WrathsU Fermentation & Yeast 13 02-04-2011 08:28 PM
How many "house" strains do you work with? cactusgarrett Recipes/Ingredients 13 10-07-2010 02:50 PM
crossing yeast strains - creating a "House strain" kunstler Brew Science 17 01-15-2010 07:58 PM