Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Hot pitching temp

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-04-2011, 02:01 AM   #1
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default Hot pitching temp

So I pitched my WLP530 Abbey Ale in my Tripel at 72F. I didn't have enough fridge space too cool the wort, so I just went ahead and pitched it thinking the temperature would fall a bit. Well, it had a quick start only taking about 6 hours and the temperature was at 74F. So I freaked a bit not wanting a hot fermentation, so I put a towel on it and swamp chilled it. The temp fell overnight to 64F and it was still thankfully bubbling. It is now at 66F, and I was planning on letting fermentation temperature rise to 70F per BCS instructions. However, since I had this overactive start the first 12 hours, should I let the temperature rise higher to take up any off flavors? It is still fermenting, so it looks like I avoided crashing out the yeast. Anything else I should be aware of, other than controlling temperature better in the future (should have used the swamp cooler before pitching )

__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 02:24 AM   #2
bassbone
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Cincinnati
Posts: 131
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Higher ferment temps = more off flavors, not less. I would let it sit at 65-68 ish for a while and raise the temp once the bubbles start to slow down ( to help finish attenuating, not really to get rid of off flavors)

__________________
bassbone is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 02:35 AM   #3
g-star
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 642
Liked 62 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

Just used WLP530 for a Westvleteren 12 clone. Pitched at 65F and let it rise to 82F and held it there for 5 days. Went from 1.095 to 1.012 in a week. Blow off tube sounded like a machine gun.

__________________
g-star is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 04:23 AM   #4
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bassbone View Post
Higher ferment temps = more off flavors, not less.
True for the beginning of fermentation, but then later yeast take up those chemicals so you want either a completely stable temperature profile or one that rises so that there is more yeast to clean up the beer.

My concern is that since I had a high starting temperature, a lot of off flavors might have been produced early on. So should I plan on increasing the temperature (and to what degree) at end of fermentation so there is enough activity to metabolize those chemicals? I'm already planning on increasing to 70, but should it go up to, and perhaps above, 74?

I guess I'm mostly being over-concerned about it and should just RDWHAHB, but wanted to hear what this forum had to say about it.
__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 04:25 AM   #5
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by g-star View Post
Just used WLP530 for a Westvleteren 12 clone. Pitched at 65F and let it rise to 82F and held it there for 5 days.
No hot alcohols from the high fermentation temperature? How quickly did it get up to 82?
__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 02:49 PM   #6
g-star
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 642
Liked 62 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JNish View Post
No hot alcohols from the high fermentation temperature? How quickly did it get up to 82?
Well, its conditioning now so I haven't had a chance to try it yet. Got up to 82F in about 36hrs. I am following the advice laid out in Brew Like A Monk and this thread and it seems to have worked out well for many people, although it may not be appropriate for all styles.
__________________
g-star is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 03:21 PM   #7
kanzimonson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 1,985
Liked 27 Times on 24 Posts

Default

I don't think the importance of pitch temp is stressed enough. I consider it more important than the fermentation temp. The yeast produce so many flavor compounds in the first 24 hours after pitching - it is critical to have them at the right temp.

In the OP's case, I don't think it does much good to pitch high and then lower the temp after fermentation begins. You'll definitely want to ramp up high to clean up at the end of fermentation. At least 75 degrees.

__________________
kanzimonson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2011, 09:55 PM   #8
JNish
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: San Francisco, CA
Posts: 60
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kanzimonson View Post
I don't think the importance of pitch temp is stressed enough. I consider it more important than the fermentation temp. The yeast produce so many flavor compounds in the first 24 hours after pitching - it is critical to have them at the right temp.

In the OP's case, I don't think it does much good to pitch high and then lower the temp after fermentation begins. You'll definitely want to ramp up high to clean up at the end of fermentation. At least 75 degrees.
Thanks for the helpful post. Unfortunately, fermentation temperature has been quite erratic, delving down to 64 when I chilled it after pitching, then back up to 68 the next day, then back down to 64. I'm putting the fermentor in a tub with an aquarium heater to try to regulate this thing. I really need to find myself another fridge to use for fermenting. Things I learned: chill before pitching. Then be able to control the temperature reliably. Swamp coolers work, but it seems to be erratic and uncontrollable.
__________________
JNish is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pitching Temp for Notty Dirty Fermentation & Yeast 3 04-03-2011 12:27 PM
Pitching temp for dry lager yeast Skinner Fermentation & Yeast 8 03-19-2011 08:12 PM
pitching ale yeast at low temp Gator1 Fermentation & Yeast 4 11-28-2010 10:05 PM
Ramping up vs pitching at temp cactusgarrett Fermentation & Yeast 1 09-02-2010 03:39 AM
Dry yeast and pitching temp Bubba_Mustafa Fermentation & Yeast 11 08-12-2010 12:22 PM