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Old 04-09-2010, 11:41 PM   #1
mclane2003
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Default hot fermenting styles

So it is getting hot outside and I am going to be keeping my carboys in a house that is not air conditioned this year. I don't really care to go through building a temp control chamber this year but I still want to keep brewing. I am sure this probably has been talked about but what styles and yeasts will taste good more consistently using warmer fermentation temps?

Am I pretty much limited to Belgian brews? Any recommendations?

Thank you

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Old 04-09-2010, 11:55 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by mclane2003 View Post
So it is getting hot outside and I am going to be keeping my carboys in a house that is not air conditioned this year. I don't really care to go through building a temp control chamber this year but I still want to keep brewing. I am sure this probably has been talked about but what styles and yeasts will taste good more consistently using warmer fermentation temps?

Am I pretty much limited to Belgian brews? Any recommendations?

Thank you
Belgian and Saison yeast are the two that come to mind.
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Old 04-11-2010, 02:03 PM   #3
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From what I`ve been able to gather belgian and saisons are still supposed to start off fairly cool like in the upper 60`s range, then slowly ramp up temp over the course of fermentation.If I were you I`d look into using a water bath and adding ice packs for fermentation.If you do ferment too warm in the 1st 3 days or so the yeast throw off a lot of byproducts that cause a hot alcohol taste in your final brew that you might have to condition out. You should be able to rig up a water bath system for pretty cheap though, and a lot of folks have good success with it, it`s just a little more work staying on top of the temps.

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Old 04-12-2010, 06:14 PM   #4
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Just a suggestion for a water bath tube is the 48 qt Ice Cube cooler. It can be used for that exclusively or, I purchased one for a MLT. After mashing I use it to hold/protect/carry my carboy and then use it as a water bath to regulate fermentation temps. Once the bulk fermentation is complete the MLT valve can be used to empty the water.

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Old 04-12-2010, 06:24 PM   #5
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Just curious as to why Belgian beers (namely Saisons) are associated with high fermentation temps. I've lived in Belgium for 5 years now and the temps are very mild all year round. An 80 degree F day in the summer would be considered very hot, with most summer days staying in the 70s. I live in a very old farmhouse, and as with most, the inside stays at about 55 - 60 degrees without heat/air conditioning. Or are the Belgian yeast strains simply the most tolerant of heat? Or are these high temp fermentations just more accepted in Belgian beers because they are noted for their yeast character? Just always wondered; thanks for any info.

Dan

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Old 04-12-2010, 06:45 PM   #6
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Or are the Belgian yeast strains simply the most tolerant of heat? Or are these high temp fermentations just more accepted in Belgian beers because they are noted for their yeast character?
Both, the fruitiness typical of higher temperature fermentations is part of the profile. Fermenting in large volumes does generate a great deal of heat. The old surface/volume problem.
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Old 04-12-2010, 06:51 PM   #7
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Both, the fruitiness typical of higher temperature fermentations is part of the profile. Fermenting in large volumes does generate a great deal of heat. The old surface/volume problem.
That is exactly right. In my exeperience I have also found the higher fermentation temperatures to help the yeast attenuate amazingly dry as well.
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Old 04-12-2010, 08:06 PM   #8
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While not a beer, you could try Apfelwein. The big thread in the winemaking forum here has people reporting fermenting into the upper 70s without any off flavors.

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Old 04-14-2010, 02:21 AM   #9
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Just curious as to why Belgian beers (namely Saisons) are associated with high fermentation temps. I've lived in Belgium for 5 years now and the temps are very mild all year round.
Glad you called this out. First time I heard about Saisons I called shenanigans too. But only because they are supposed to be fermented in the 80 degree heat of summer, yet also drank that same summer. Ever other big beer (6-7% and up) takes several months to mature. That would mean making big beers in the late winter or early spring to drink in the summer.

Just my 'ignunt opinion.
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Old 04-15-2010, 02:38 AM   #10
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Most yeast can tolerate highish temps, it's a low pitching rate/unhealthy yeast that creates ridiculous levels of unpleasant esters. Many British yeasts will do just fine above 70.

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