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Old 07-11-2012, 09:42 PM   #1
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Default Good, cheap dry yeast

Now than nottingham costs as much as safale, is there a different good and cheap dry ale yeast?

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Old 07-11-2012, 09:54 PM   #2
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I think that's it. I don't know if I would want to use a cheaper yeast...notty and safale are tried and true. Have you ever thought about yeast washing?

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Old 07-11-2012, 09:57 PM   #3
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here is a thread discussing the merits of washing your dry yeast.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/har...-yeast-339941/

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Old 07-13-2012, 12:09 AM   #4
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You might try Cooper's. Not as widely available, but definitely cheaper and always worked fine for me.

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Old 07-13-2012, 02:35 AM   #5
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I don't even wash it, as Chris White from White Labs says anything gained from the practice isn't worth the risk of contamination. So, as a few members here suggested, I scoop out slurry into the same sanitized jars, pop them in the fridge, use Mr. Malty's pitching rate Calc to determine how much to use for each batch, and done. Super simple and easy. That said if washing works for you, by all means continue on, but much like anything else, ymmv. The slurry method has served me quite well. One smack pack of 1469 should go at least 4-5 brews if I'm careful enough... 3 and I figured it's paid me back.

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Old 07-13-2012, 03:31 PM   #6
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hey duckmanco - can you detail your slurry process? I'm interested.

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Old 07-13-2012, 03:34 PM   #7
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Or using one packet to make a starter for multiple brews...

Work? Yes!

But if you want to MAXIMIZE your savings it is this... Yeast harvesting, or using an existing Yeast Cake.

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Old 07-13-2012, 05:46 PM   #8
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I'm going to try reusing and possibly washing yeast but i'm not interested in making a starter. I can just pitch plenty of washed yeast right? The slurry seems to contain more than enough yeast to not need a starter.

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Old 07-13-2012, 05:50 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boek View Post
I'm going to try reusing and possibly washing yeast but i'm not interested in making a starter. I can just pitch plenty of washed yeast right? The slurry seems to contain more than enough yeast to not need a starter.
If you don't intend to make a starter, the best bet is to just pitch slurry. if you use hop bags the trub isn't too bad.

the last issue of BYO suggested scraping off the top layer of the cake and discarding and then using a spatula to scrape up the cake into a jar, 1/4" at a time, leaving the bottom most part of the layer (so you never scrape against the bucket). you want about 1 - 1 1/2 cups
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Old 07-13-2012, 10:22 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doed View Post
hey duckmanco - can you detail your slurry process? I'm interested.
Sure thing. Here is where I first read it, and where reusing yeast made sense to me, as trying to wash it annoyed me greatly. Some guys get awesome looking healthy fat white yeast slurry filled jars by washing --- I didn't.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/why...t-cake-166221/

Highly recommend reading the above post, lots of great info.

And what I do came from there.

1. Sanitize mason jars, lids etc all equipment that will touch beer or hold yeast. Boiling the mason jars and their lids etc. is also good, I sanitize.

2. Rack finished beer to wherever you intend for it to go, preferably leaving a few ounces in the bucket/carboy.

3. Swirl the fermenter to get the cake into a slurry.

4. Either scoop (didn't like the mess this made with my buckets) or even better, and a must for a carboy, pour yeast cake into equal portions into sanitized mason jars and put the lid on lightly --- Chris White on the same Sunday Session podcast stated that the yeast in the slurry will offgass in the jars, and the back pressure from this could kill yeast. He recommended venting the jars every hour for (don't quote me here) the first 24 hours. I screw the lids on but don't tighten them down, and vent the lid a few times the first night I harvest.

That's it. It's incredibly simple. I've found that straining hops before the wort goes into the fermentor obviously gets cleaner yeast. I also use mr. Malty to repitch from slurry inputting the harvest date, and using the sliders to create a worst case scenario. So, I'll set non yeast solids to the highest percentage, and call my slurry super thin. Both of those settings will cause the pitch rate Calc to have you pitch more of your slurry then if you set them to the opposite. While it might be over pitching slightly, I'm comfortable with it and figure it accounts for things I can't see. It's worked great so far.

I just harvested 4 jars of 1469 the other day and will repitch all of those into beers, and then if I want, I can reharvest from those as well and still only be at the 2nd generation--- another reason why using slurry, and not the whole cake works really well.

Hops this helps, any questions, let me know.
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