Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > flocculent yeast + high gravity + extended secondary = no carbonation?
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-15-2010, 03:24 PM   #1
permo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 2,711
Liked 22 Times on 21 Posts

Default flocculent yeast + high gravity + extended secondary = no carbonation?

I have a strong scotch ale that I used nottinham ale yeast for. 1.075 OG 1.019 FG..tastes great.

I primary fermented for 2 weeks, and moved to secondary at 55 degrees for 3 months. I recently primed and bottled this beer, and I am a bit concerned. this beer is crystal clear.......I am wondering if there will be enough yeast to carbonate this beer? I have them all sitting at 70 degrees

I know this has been beat to death on the boards, but I didn't think 3 months was long enough to floc all the yeast!

__________________
permo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 03:25 PM   #2
Brooklyn-Brewtality
Four Beasts Brewery
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brooklyn-Brewtality's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 2,278
Liked 22 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

don't worry. that beer could look crystal clear, but there is more than likely plenty of yeasties floating around in there.

__________________

Kegged: Berlinerweisse, Dubbel, Galaxy Wheat
Bottled: Golden Strong, Mild, IIPA, Rauch
Fermenting: Saison, Imperial Wheat Stout, Brett Saison, APA, Brett Roggenbier

Brooklyn-Brewtality is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 05:34 PM   #3
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,654
Liked 135 Times on 128 Posts

Default

It might take a bit longer, but it is almost impossible to remove enough yeast from homebrew to prevent carbonation.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk

david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 06:15 PM   #4
permo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 2,711
Liked 22 Times on 21 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
It might take a bit longer, but it is almost impossible to remove enough yeast from homebrew to prevent carbonation.
That is what I like to hear.

This has also got me thinking. I have a big %10 ABV barley wine that I just racked to secondary, I planned on 6 months in secondary, I think that might be borderline too long to get good carbonation. Thoughts>
__________________
permo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 06:34 PM   #5
kevmoron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 268
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

For beers greater than 8% ABV, it's very possible that bottle-carbing will not work without adding fresh yeast. In fact, it has happened to me several times, even after waiting several months with the bottles at room temp. It's not a matter of having enough yeast left (in every case, i did get sedimentation), but rather of the viability of the yeast. For a 10% alc beer, the yeast will have been through a tough battle, and with 10% alcohol, they simply quit working. In that case you would need to add a fresh dose of a more alcohol tolerant strain to get the carbonation.

For the poster above, 6 months in 10% alcohol will kill just about any yeast. I would be amazed if you get carbonation from what is left in the beer. Just add a fresh, alcohol-tolerant yeast, and you will be good to go.

__________________
kevmoron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 08:00 PM   #6
permo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: North Dakota
Posts: 2,711
Liked 22 Times on 21 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kevmoron View Post
For beers greater than 8% ABV, it's very possible that bottle-carbing will not work without adding fresh yeast. In fact, it has happened to me several times, even after waiting several months with the bottles at room temp. It's not a matter of having enough yeast left (in every case, i did get sedimentation), but rather of the viability of the yeast. For a 10% alc beer, the yeast will have been through a tough battle, and with 10% alcohol, they simply quit working. In that case you would need to add a fresh dose of a more alcohol tolerant strain to get the carbonation.

For the poster above, 6 months in 10% alcohol will kill just about any yeast. I would be amazed if you get carbonation from what is left in the beer. Just add a fresh, alcohol-tolerant yeast, and you will be good to go.
Great, the beer I currently have bottled is 7.2% so the yeast should be in good shape....my bigger barleywine....I think I will pitch a fresh nottingham washed slurry into the bottling bucket...just to be sure there is enough in there to do the job right.
__________________
permo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 08:13 PM   #7
kevmoron
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 268
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Don't take my 8% recommendation as a hard and fast rule, as it is arbitrary. For 7.2% I'm sure you will be fine.

Also, you could always try bottling the barleywine and waiting a month or two to see if it works, if you have a way to aliquot a measured amount of yeast to each bottle later, in case it fails. I had a Quadrupel that failed to carbonate, and out of laziness I let it sit in the bottles for 6 months before adding new yeast. I just uncapped each one and used a pipetman to aliquot 0.75 ml of slurry into each bottle, then recapped. After that, it carbonated within a couple of weeks.

__________________
kevmoron is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-15-2010, 08:46 PM   #8
EvilGnome6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Posts: 678
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts

Default

I've had mixed results getting my higher-gravity Belgian ales to condition without pitching fresh yeast. This is why most Belgian brewers add fresh yeast at bottling time. Ommegang's Randy Thiel recommends it for beers with an OG over 1.060.

On the Yeast: Guide to Bottle Conditioning

Quote:
Yeast for bottle conditioning is your next concern, says Randy Thiel, the head brewer at Ommegang. Thiel explains that the yeast used during primary fermentation of strong Belgian brews —above 15° Plato or 1.060 original gravity — gets beat up during fermentation and will be of little value during bottle conditioning. If you condition your beer at least two weeks before bottling, most of this old yeast will drop out of suspension. Then you can add new yeast.
I have no idea whether or not yours will carbonate but pitching a little fresh yeast at bottling time for a big beer or one that has aged for a long time is cheap insurance, IMO.
__________________
EvilGnome6 is offline
crummyrummy Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
High Gravity Brewing - Secondary Fermenter jbambuti General Techniques 11 04-24-2010 02:06 PM
Extended Time In Secondary, Yeast, and Bottle Conditioning DrSanta Fermentation & Yeast 1 11-07-2009 03:22 PM
High gravity after transfer to secondary amsmith592 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 10-08-2008 02:30 AM
High Gravity Secondary? at 70' or 50'? 5 Is Not Enough General Techniques 10 02-14-2008 02:55 AM
Low flocculent Yeast strains gfranks7807 Recipes/Ingredients 3 07-29-2007 05:57 PM