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Old 07-09-2012, 10:29 PM   #21
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They were Extract-batches . I always kept the Beer in the Primary for 3 Weeks and then primed and bottled . But , all of them ended up with a very sour and undrinkable Beer . At first , I was suspicious of infection . Although , I had sanitized everything very carefully . Sometimes even so extremely as if I was a Surgeon in an Operation room .

As I explained my brew day in details , some HBT members told me that it couldn't be any infection . Eventually , a member told me the trick .

If only she had told me that much earlier .

Anyway , I brewed a small test batch and let it sit in the Primary for 1 Week and transferred it into the Secondary and let it sit there for 2 Weeks .

At the end , it was the first drinkable Beer I've ever made .

Hector
that is interesting, I wonder what is up with that. I was planning on not touching for 2 weeks but maybe i'll transfer to secondary when I dry hop.
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:32 PM   #22
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that is interesting, I wonder what is up with that. I was planning on not touching for 2 weeks but maybe i'll transfer to secondary when I dry hop.
There's no need to transfer. That yeast strain is good quality and I use it often. I dryhop many batches right in the fermenter and it works out fine. The key with most yeast strains is to simply stay within the optimum fermentation temperature range.
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:37 PM   #23
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The goal is to pitch sufficient yeast into the fermenter to achieve active fermentation as quickly as possible. A 50% kill going into a starter is no big deal, because you don't care about the lag time in a starter. You do care about it in the fermenter, or you wouldn't bother with making starters in the first place.
This makes sense. Thanks.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:51 PM   #24
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Yooper how long do you typically leave in the fermenter with safale at optimal temps

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Old 07-10-2012, 03:56 PM   #25
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I hear the hydration argument a lot. I've used Safale on 5 batches so far from extract kits where the yeast is sitting at room temp for months and I put it right into the aerated wort and get insane krausen in 24 hours.

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Old 07-10-2012, 05:12 PM   #26
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I hear the hydration argument a lot. I've used Safale on 5 batches so far from extract kits where the yeast is sitting at room temp for months and I put it right into the aerated wort and get insane krausen in 24 hours.
Well that must be the absolute perfect way to do it then.
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Old 07-10-2012, 05:22 PM   #27
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Well that must be the absolute perfect way to do it then.
No, not what I was saying. My point is, a lot of worry occurs when it comes to pitching and, in my lazy methods of just dumping it in the fermenter, I've had zero issues even with a beer with an insane OG of 1.101.
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Old 07-10-2012, 05:31 PM   #28
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I'm curious about losing 1/2 the yeast cells too. If a packet of dry yeast has ~ twice the cells as a smack pack, but half of them die if you don't hydrate, how is that different than underpitching with 1 smack pack. Sounds like you'd end up with about the same number of healthy yeast cells...(as long as your smack pack has close to 100% healthy cells). I know from experience that 1 smack pack in a 1.054 wort is seriously underpitching...with that said, I just brewed a 1.044 dry stout with S-04, and didn't rehydrate.

Not arguing with the pros on this, but the math just doesn't seem to work.

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Old 07-10-2012, 05:31 PM   #29
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No, not what I was saying. My point is, a lot of worry occurs when it comes to pitching and, in my lazy methods of just dumping it in the fermenter, I've had zero issues even with a beer with an insane OG of 1.101.
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Well that must be the absolute perfect way to do it then.
Actually, if you read the Fermentis instructions it says you can either bloom the yeast first or you can direct pitch into the wort. (I'm obviously paraphrasing.)

And yes, anecdotally, there are lots of people making great beer pitching dry yeast.

Although, at an OG of 1.101 I'm guessing it probably finished under-attenuated, but I could be wrong.
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Old 07-10-2012, 05:40 PM   #30
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No, not what I was saying. My point is, a lot of worry occurs when it comes to pitching and, in my lazy methods of just dumping it in the fermenter, I've had zero issues even with a beer with an insane OG of 1.101.
I think the response here is more in line with the mentality. The question is, "Do you care a lot about the quality of the finished product?"

The reason to hydrate the yeast is due to the fact that the difference in gravity inside the yeast vs outside the yeast is such that the water inside the yeast gets sucked out. In essence, the yeast goes poof, and implodes. Some yeast is strong enough to withstand the pressure, but a straight pitch of dry will negate the bonuses of pitching dry yeast in the first place. You lose a considerable amount of the population.

It's similar to people that pitch their tubes or smack packs without making a starter. There is a thread floating around here where they studied the effects of over pitching and under pitching. I've seen that underpitched yeast mostly takes longer to take off, and also will throw more off flavors. The end result is going to be beer, but it might not taste as good as it could.

YMMV, naturally. It's one of those brewer's choice type of things.
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