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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > fermentation time?
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Old 08-23-2012, 03:00 AM   #1
lukefindley
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Default fermentation time?

Is there an advantage to fermenting longer than a week? I brewed a all grain Bells Oberon clone with 5lbs of peaches that went in the fermentation bucket as soon as I poured in my wort.

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Old 08-24-2012, 12:50 AM   #2
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Are you planning on racking into a secondary? Fermentation isn't neccessarily finished in a week. Most brews probably will within 4-7 days. Only disadvantage to not leaving it in long enough is that it may not be finished. I leave mine in primary a minimum of two weeks, but usually don't secondary. Usually mine are in primary for 3-4 weeks, then to the keg.

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Old 08-24-2012, 02:34 AM   #3
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I think im going to bottle from here. From all I've read, it seems like the only benefit I gain from a secondary would be a more clear or clean brew. If that's the case then i'll just bottle from my primary. Any suggestions on dealing with all the peaches and "funk" im going to have in the bottom of my primary?

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Old 08-25-2012, 12:53 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukefindley View Post
I think im going to bottle from here. From all I've read, it seems like the only benefit I gain from a secondary would be a more clear or clean brew. If that's the case then i'll just bottle from my primary. Any suggestions on dealing with all the peaches and "funk" im going to have in the bottom of my primary?
Waiting longer can help all the garbage drop out of suspension. So can cool (or cold) crashing, if you're using fermentation temperature control. My recommendation is get the wort as cool as you can AFTER FERMENTATION FINISHES while in the carboy and before bottling. This should help clear it up for you. I personally would have done the peaches in secondary, and tasted it every few days until I got the desired level of peach flavor into the beer.
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Old 08-25-2012, 03:37 PM   #5
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My "temperature control" is an area in my basement with no sunlight. It is currently about 74 degrees down there.
What is your reason for the peaches being added in the secondary as opposed to tossing them in my primary as soon as I poured in my wort? I read so many different opinions on that.
Lastly, what would you say is the best method for snatching a taste? I have it in a"true brew" bucket. I would guess that it wouldn't be wise to take it from the spicket on the bottom due to the fact that you will probably taste a lot more peaches and potentially trub that way.
~ Sorry for the 3 part question but I'm hungry for knowledge.

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Old 08-25-2012, 04:32 PM   #6
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Adding fruit at the start of fermentation will result in most of the fruit aroma being driven off with all the C)2 being generated. Fruit should be added (to either primary or secondary) after most fermentation is done to help preserve the flavor and aroma.

Generally a week is too short. I have some beers that take several weeks to finish. If you bottle before it is done, you will get gushers, and might get bottle bombs.

I use a plastic turkey baster to take samples. Sanitize the baster (put in sanitizer, if none available, dip it in boiling water). I use it to fill my hydrometer jar, check the gravity, and then drink the sample.

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Old 08-25-2012, 04:46 PM   #7
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Did you use fresh peaches? One of the disadvantage of fruit in the primary is the added risk of wild yeasts from the fruit interfering with your intended yeast. There's usually enough alcohol in the secondary to overcome any impact they may have. You'll probably also find that your beer is a higher ABV than intended, since the fruit sugars will ferment more aggressively in the primary.

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Old 08-25-2012, 07:50 PM   #8
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after reading the last two reply's, i think i will certainly leave it in the primary for another week (which makes 2) and then transfer to my secondary and let it sit there for another week (3 in total. two in the primary, 1 in the secondary.) i guess i can just pop the top off the "true brew" bucket to steal a sample. i hope everything is ok with my peaches and the yeast. i did use fresh peaches. i washed them, pitted them, dropped them in boiling water for a min or so to hopefully sanitize them then i put them in the bottom of my primary bucket right before i poured in my wort. the airlock smelled of peaches like mad when it was bubbling. this is my first all grain brew also. im really hooked on brewing although still very novice i am already addicted to all aspects of the hobby. i really hope this one turns out similar to the Bells Oberon with a peachy note. this ones for the wife...

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Old 08-25-2012, 08:33 PM   #9
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well, i just popped the top and 1st: see attached pic for what it is looking like. it looks like all of my hops and peaches are still floating on top and some of the hops have what looks like mold growing on them. it may be yeast however. i have never seen this so im not sure if i should be concerned or if that is a normal appearance.

and 2nd: i got a good sample and tasted it. absolutely NO peach taste at all. so, now here is what i am thinking, can i add another 5lbs of peaches into the secondary for my peach flavor or will that run the risk of throwing everything off. the sample did seem to have a bit of a high abv tinge to it which personally i am fine with as long as it comes out as a good balanced beer..

2012-08-25_15-12-55_273.jpg  
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Old 08-26-2012, 12:02 AM   #10
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I don't do many fruit beers, but it seems like properly pasteurizing the fruit at 170-180F might have been a good idea. Just my 2c. That mold frightens me.

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