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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Fermentation temp
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Old 02-26-2010, 07:07 PM   #1
gmadd
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Default Fermentation temp

Just got a temp controller, it's great no more temp swings. So now the question comes up where should I set the temp? For example the smack pack I just used says 60-72 fermentation temp. Where in that range should I keep it? Does it matter? Does the amount of differential matter?

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Old 02-26-2010, 07:18 PM   #2
PorterIV
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gmadd,

I always set it on the lower end of the temperature range as the heat created by the fermentation will tend to keep the temperature of the wort at the set temp or in the differential above the set temp. I also set it up with a 2 degree differential so the fridge or fermwrap is not always turning on and off. For example, in your case I would set it at about 62. But I also like cleaner beers over fruity beers.

What is your yeast strain and what type of beer are you making? 60-72 is a large range.

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Old 02-26-2010, 07:55 PM   #3
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It's an Irish Red Ale. I got Wyeast #1272, it says optimum remp 60-72. I just kind of set it based on my own guesses. Right now it's set at 65 with a 3 degree differential using a Thermowrap. It's been fluctuating between 65 and 68. How would I decide which end of the recommendation to set it? Why do you set it at the lower end?

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Old 02-26-2010, 08:28 PM   #4
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Start cool and end warm is the main idea.

For an Irish red I'd start around 64 and raise it very slowly over a weeks time to 68 and then keep it at 68 for the remainder of fermentation.

BUT make sure your probe is measuring the liquid in the fermenter not the air outside the fermenter. Use a thermowell OR tape the probe to the side of the fermentor. I tape mine to the side and it works great!

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Old 02-26-2010, 09:30 PM   #5
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From what I have read, and experienced, the higher in the range you go the quicker the ferment but you also will likely get some fruitier taster versus a lower temp will give you a cleaner product but a slower ferment. If you go too low below the recommended range you may not get the full attenuation, if you go too high above the recommended you may get off flavors. Most of the time, I shoot for the lower end of the recommended spectrum and look for a little cleaner beer. That's just me.

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Old 02-26-2010, 09:37 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PorterIV View Post
From what I have read, and experienced, the higher in the range you go the quicker the ferment but you also will likely get some fruitier taster versus a lower temp will give you a cleaner product but a slower ferment. If you go too low below the recommended range you may not get the full attenuation, if you go too high above the recommended you may get off flavors. Most of the time, I shoot for the lower end of the recommended spectrum and look for a little cleaner beer. That's just me.
It's somewhat time sensitive. If you keep things cool for the first few days you will avoid the off flavors, esters, fusel alcohol, etc... Then raise the temp to get full attenuation.

Start cool & finish warm
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