Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Fermentation generates heat?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-06-2013, 09:46 AM   #1
kinjiru
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Porto, Portugal
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Fermentation generates heat?

Hi guys,

I'm fermenting a Duvel look a like beer and I've noticed that the fermentation temperature was 4-5 degrees higher than the room temperature. I can only assume that the fermentation process generates heat.

After 2 days bubbling like a AK-47 with unlimited ammo (sugar candy has this effect ), the temperature came down to room temperature.

Has any of you guys experienced this situation?

Regards,

Rui

__________________
kinjiru is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 10:00 AM   #2
jesseroberge
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 276
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Fermentation always generates heat, it's thermo-elastic .... Always be careful because if you don't have a fermenting chamber you could be fermenting a bit high... I like to ferment on the low end of the scale because of the heat produced by my fermentation... If you do a perfect starter and dump it into the wort it's like a BOMB ..... It will roar like a lion and heat up like a furnace... Keep an eye on the room temp before pitching and add 5 to 8 degrees more, and then ask yourself am I busting the trmps here !!

Cheers !!

__________________
jesseroberge is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 10:19 AM   #3
bethebrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 491
Liked 29 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jesseroberge View Post
Fermentation always generates heat, it's thermo-elastic .... Always be careful because if you don't have a fermenting chamber you could be fermenting a bit high... I like to ferment on the low end of the scale because of the heat produced by my fermentation... If you do a perfect starter and dump it into the wort it's like a BOMB ..... It will roar like a lion and heat up like a furnace... Keep an eye on the room temp before pitching and add 5 to 8 degrees more, and then ask yourself am I busting the trmps here !!

Cheers !!
What in the hell are you brewing that roars like a lion and heats up like a furnace? Aluminum cans?
__________________
bethebrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 12:54 PM   #4
william_shakes_beer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,879
Liked 92 Times on 80 Posts

Default

Many brewers report that their usual fermentation regimine where temperateure control is available, is to begin fermentation at the lower end of the published range and ramp up toward the end. This is because the fermentations does the opposite: fresh yeast with large quantities of fermentatles (at the beginning) produce vigorous fermentation and high levels of heat. As the fermentables taper off, the fermentations slows down and fermentation temp drops.

__________________
william_shakes_beer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 01:03 PM   #5
kinjiru
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Porto, Portugal
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Thanks for the feedback. Yeah, I definably have to buy a fermenting chamber....

Cheers,

Rui

__________________
kinjiru is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-06-2013, 02:41 PM   #6
austinb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 247
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

In general fermentation raises the temperature about 2-5 degrees however, with a very active fermentation I've heard of it going as high as 10 degrees over ambient temperatures. I use 6.5 gallon glass carboys as my primary fermenters because plastic buckets insulate your fermentation raising the temps higher than a glass fermenter would. Room temperature is 68 degrees (although many people keep it at 70 or more), this just happens to be the temperature many craft breweries keep their actual fermentation temps at for ales because most American ale yeasts ferment clean and fast at that temperature. Of course if you kept your ambient temperature at 68 degrees your actual fermentation temperature would be in the low to mid 70s. You may be alright in the low 70s but if the yeast is stressed for any other reasons such as underpitching because you didn't make a starter you are likely to start getting off flavors. You were probably ok at 72 degrees (although I'm not sure how well duvel yeast performs at those temps) but in the future just to play it safe I would try and keep actual fermentation temps below 70.

Ferm chambers are great because they automatically regulate the temperature but they also take up space and cost money so if you are short on either of those there are other options to control temps. The simplest way is to get a big tub (plastic 55 gallon drums cut in half work great) put the carboy in it and fill it with cold water. Then as needed rotate ice packs (plastic drink bottles filled with water work great). If you are only a few degrees high, draping an old t-shirt over the carboy and letting it hang down into the water will cause it to wick up moisture from the bucket and evaporate causing evaporative cooling and ice packs may not be needed. The t-shirt can also be used to keep light out if the bucket is not in a totally dark location. If ambient temperatures are too cold you can also warm up fermentation temps with this setup by using an aquarium heater.

__________________
austinb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-08-2013, 06:08 PM   #7
Tegra
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 22
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by austinb
.....Ferm chambers are great because they automatically regulate the temperature.....
Another thing to consider in fermentation chambers is air movement. I use a small computer fan to pull the air from the top 1/4 through a ABS elbow and pipe to blow to the bottom of the chamber. Following HVAC practice, I have the temperature sensor hanging inside this pipe to get a valid sample. I also space the bottle off the bottom so that air of the set temperature is always flowing across all surfaces of the bottle.

The hope is that the internal temperature of the wort will be within a couple degrees of the outside temperature.

Tom
__________________
Tegra is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-08-2013, 10:44 PM   #8
raouliii
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
raouliii's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Ponchatoula, LA
Posts: 768
Liked 63 Times on 56 Posts
Likes Given: 89

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tegra View Post
The hope is that the internal temperature of the wort will be within a couple degrees of the outside temperature.
I'd bet that this probe placement results in wort temperatures far more than a couple degrees warmer during the first few days of fermentation.
__________________
On Tap:
NippleRub Ultra
Ranger(ish) IPA clone
Horizocade Amber
Rochefort 7

In the Chamber:
Big Breasted Blonde

Next Up:
????
raouliii is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-09-2013, 10:55 AM   #9
kinjiru
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Porto, Portugal
Posts: 25
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Hi guys, great tips!

Austinb, I live in an apartment, so I will try your techniques you gave me Also, the summer is ending so I my life will be a lot easier on the months to come.

Cheers!

__________________
kinjiru is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yeast generates its own heat nachov Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 08-21-2013 04:54 PM
Heat of Fermentation Netflyer Brew Science 26 11-22-2009 04:08 AM
fermentation heat wbgv Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 11-29-2008 02:12 PM
Keg generates its own CO2 PitsPale Bottling/Kegging 3 09-06-2008 10:56 PM
Fermentation causes HEAT??? Ironhead Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 02-01-2008 09:55 PM