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Old 09-18-2012, 10:55 PM   #1
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Default Ever tried Champagne Yeast to finish a beer?

I've been thinking about using a champagne yeast to finish a beer off. A secondary yeast pitch after conditioning, as it goes into the keg (instead of force carbing). I know that it's used in some styles when bottling. I guess I'm thinking it will give a dry or crisp finish but I really don't know. I've only used it to make Ginger Ale.

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Old 09-19-2012, 03:20 AM   #2
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I believe Brooklyn Breweries Sorachi Ace (one of my fav's) is bottled with champagne yeast to carbonate. It's worth a shot in my book.

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Old 09-19-2012, 05:00 AM   #3
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Unibroue does this on a lot if their beers if I recall correctly.

The only trouble is if you don't filter out the old yeast, they can eat some of the priming sugar too giving you kind of a compromise between the two.

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Old 09-19-2012, 02:04 PM   #4
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Champagne yeast doesn't give you any extra flavors in the bottle/keg. It's commonly used for bottling because it's neutral, it can survive in higher amounts of alcohol and/or acidity, and it won't eat anything but the priming sugar.

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Old 09-19-2012, 02:12 PM   #5
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Right but it's been my impression that the carbonation character is also different using
champagne yeast- that it can lend a more sparkling quality to it. I could be mistaken on that though.

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Old 09-19-2012, 02:30 PM   #6
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Boulevard supposedly filters out their primary strain and carbonates with champagne yeast in their Smokestack series. It's great beer, but the yeast they use hardly compacts on the bottom of the bottles so you have to be pretty careful in pouring so as to not end up with a bunch of yeast flocs in your glass. Either that or I'm just incredibly unlucky in pouring these bottles.

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Old 09-19-2012, 04:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JesperX View Post
Right but it's been my impression that the carbonation character is also different using
champagne yeast- that it can lend a more sparkling quality to it. I could be mistaken on that though.
I've never noticed a difference in beers I've bottled with champagne yeast.
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Old 09-19-2012, 09:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReverseApacheMaster View Post
Champagne yeast doesn't give you any extra flavors in the bottle/keg. It's commonly used for bottling because it's neutral, it can survive in higher amounts of alcohol and/or acidity, and it won't eat anything but the priming sugar.
Most champagne yeast will kill any ale yeast in the bottle. If you're a micro jealously protecting your house strain, this is an added plus. But if you're a homebrewer who is kegging, there is absolutely no benefit to using champagne yeast.
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Old 09-19-2012, 11:47 PM   #9
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Most champagne yeast will kill any ale yeast in the bottle. If you're a micro jealously protecting your house strain, this is an added plus. But if you're a homebrewer who is kegging, there is absolutely no benefit to using champagne yeast.
There's no need for the ale yeast in the bottle if you're relying on the champagne yeast to do the carbonation.
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Old 09-20-2012, 01:21 AM   #10
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I actually just bottled up a Golden strong with Fermentis yellow champagne yeast about 5 hours before the start of this post but the problem was that the yeast did not want to rehydrate at all (let sit in the warm priming solution for 10-15 minutes) so at the end of the bottling bucket there were loads of ever-so-slightly bloated grains at the bottom. I looked at all the bottes closely and noticed only a handful of grains were in there. Hoping this batch carbs up but now I won't touch it for a few months because of this. There was a little bit of original yeast sucked up but hopefully this idea of the champagne yeast killing the ale yeast doesn't occur!

The yeast was half used on a previous batch about 2 months ago and stored just folded up in fridge-freezer temps since then. Bad idea?

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