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-   -   Dry yeast ONLY! (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/dry-yeast-only-134854/)

younger96 09-02-2009 12:11 AM

Dry yeast ONLY!
 
So I first brewed about 15 years ago, and recall that dry yeast was all that was available. I started using liquid yeast (vials not the smack pack) sometime in 2000 timeframe. Now I live in Maine and I cannot buy the liquid yeast anywhere, only a few brew shops around and they carry dry only.

I was just getting started back when I used dry yeast before, I don't recall ever making a starter, just pitched right from package to wort. Now, I feel like I need a 1 L starter or so for the little guys, and for my first batch I did make up a starter and gave it a day to get happy.

1) Am on the right track by making a starter with the dry yeast?
2) Is a liter sufficient or should I be pushing it to 2L?
3) Stiring/Swirling/etc is good for the starter as I understand?

Yooper 09-02-2009 12:13 AM

You can easily buy liquid yeast from any online brewstore, with good results. Since I live 150 miles from any brewstore, that's what I do.

But, if you're using dry yeast that's fine! Don't use a starter for dry yeast (it's not necessary and may be detrimental to a healthy fermentation), and just rehydrate according to package directions.

Oh, and welcome back to the obsession!

petep1980 09-02-2009 12:13 AM

Dry yeast doesn't need a starter.

I really wonder why I use anything but dry yeast.

I would HIGHLY recommend AGAINST ordering lager liquid yeast in the mail. Unless you live close that stuff in summer at least will sit in shipping trucks without any temp control and who knows the viability of the product you are getting. I am 0 for 2 in liquid yeast even starting which I have ordered through the mail.

MBasile 09-02-2009 12:14 AM

From what I've read recently, you don't make a starter for dry yeast, but you should rehydrate them.

Revvy 09-02-2009 12:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by younger96 (Post 1521122)
So I first brewed about 15 years ago, and recall that dry yeast was all that was available. I started using liquid yeast (vials not the smack pack) sometime in 2000 timeframe. Now I live in Maine and I cannot buy the liquid yeast anywhere, only a few brew shops around and they carry dry only.

I was just getting started back when I used dry yeast before, I don't recall ever making a starter, just pitched right from package to wort. Now, I feel like I need a 1 L starter or so for the little guys, and for my first batch I did make up a starter and gave it a day to get happy.

1) Am on the right track by making a starter with the dry yeast?
2) Is a liter sufficient or should I be pushing it to 2L?
3) Stiring/Swirling/etc is good for the starter as I understand?

You're misreading it....For dry you don't need a starter....You can pitch it right onto the wort...or you can rehydrate it in some warm water for 15-30 minutes before pitching...I lean towards the sprinkle on the surface of the wort, wait 15-30 minutes, to rehydrate on the wort, and then move the fermenter into the brew closet, which mixes the yeast in a bit...There is all sorts of arguments back and forth as to the supposed "best" way, but really they all work fine.

:mug:

thisjrp4 09-02-2009 12:58 AM

Dry yeast is the nuts. Rehydrate as you chill your wort and then pitch it in.

Homercidal 09-02-2009 03:23 PM

Dry yeast can do better with rehydrating, according to what I've heard. The plain water will help them rebuild the cell walls without worry about other stuff getting into the cells first.

Anyway, they usually don't say to do it on the homebrew packets, but the same yeast packaged for the professionals have instructions for rehydrating. Why not use the same procedure the pros use?

But either way will be fine. For bigger beers I usually pitch 2 packets. Still pretty cheap.

If you just really like playing with yeasts, maybe try harvesting some from a bottle of commercial beer? I've harvested some yeast from Bells beer, and a couple of others. Then you can keep a supply of good yeast in the fridge (or freezer, if you add some special stuff to keep them from bursting their cells). I'm doing that for a few Belgian yeasts that can only be had in liquid form.

humann_brewing 09-02-2009 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Homercidal (Post 1522124)
But either way will be fine. For bigger beers I usually pitch 2 packets. Still pretty cheap.

Now that US-05 and 04 are double in price, the dry scene is not looking quite as appetizing.

GilaMinumBeer 09-02-2009 03:33 PM

I have been using dry yeast nearly exclusively for the last couple years save one Bock I made where I opted to use a liquid strain on half the batch.

My practice is to begin the re-hydration while doing a short re-ciculative cooling. Once the yeast are adequately quenched, I spritz sanitize my liner, pitch the yeast, and then begin to fill the fermenter with the cooled wort.

With these methods I have eliminated poor attenuation issues, signifigantly reduced lag times, and have no need for a starter or stir plate. Plus, I can buy bulk quantities of yeast and store them (refridgerated) without concern for signifigant loss of viability.

whats more, is taht the "industry" has effectively doubled the number of strains available (as compared to only a few years ago) thus allowing for at least one strain capable of producing a acceptible profile for "most" any beer style.

GilaMinumBeer 09-02-2009 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by humann_brewing (Post 1522137)
Now that US-05 and 04 are double in price, the dry scene is not looking quite as appetizing.

Pricewise this is true. But for storability, ease of shipping, and simplicity in cell count, dry is still a win for this brewer.


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