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Old 11-12-2013, 10:49 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetcell View Post
SUGGESTED EDIT: use a calculator, such as http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html, to determine how much slurry to use (based on the date you washed, or harvested, the yeast). if you do not have sufficient slurry, make a starter.
I have a problem with this one. I think Mr. Malty is way too conservative in viability numbers:

At 2 months old it gives the viability as 10%, which is clearly wrong. At 12 months it gives the same 10% viability, which is probably about right.
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Old 11-12-2013, 11:45 PM   #12
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I included a link to yeastcalc as well since both calculators are widely used and respected, and if you know of a better resource I'm all ears. I think the important thing is to recognize that we need to be conscious of viability when considering pitch rate. Honestly we could probably have another entire thread discussing best practices with harvested yeast, whether originally from liquid or dry cultures. The focus here is really meant to be on using the yeast from the initial dry state. For the sake of completeness, we should be acknowledging that the yeast can be harvested and reused, and that you should have an awareness of viability before reusing - I think we hit those points. I'll restate it that way in the first post for clarity, though, along with keeping links to the pitching rate calcs

Edit: Just edited the reuse portion to emphasize that it is important to know viability of your yeast slurry before pitching harvested yeast, and to reflect that determining viability of a harvested yeast slurry falls outside the scope of this FAQ.

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Old 11-14-2013, 09:35 PM   #13
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Found a PDF from Fermentis today that discusses how quickly yeast should be pitched after rehydrating. I actually had to share it on another thread earlier because I had been pretty vocal about pitching within 30 minutes of rehydrating, and while that is still ideal, there is information from Fermentis about it being safe to keep the rehydrated yeast in sterile water for a period of time dependent on temperature without risk of contamination. That said, the yeast would still exhaust the glycogen and trehalose reserves (Clayton Cone) that give it an energy boost early on to power it as it enters the growth phase, so ideally you would still pitch within 30 minutes of rehydrating.

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Old 11-20-2013, 03:27 PM   #14
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Added "Rehydration of Active Dry Brewing Yeast and its Effect on Cell Viability" from Journal of the Institute of Brewing on the Wiley Online Library.

Thanks duboman

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Old 11-23-2013, 02:22 PM   #15
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Excellent sticky boydster.

Now if people will actually READ it before posting questions to which you have already very clearly and concisely provided answers, the HBT world will be a better place.
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Old 11-23-2013, 10:26 PM   #16
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Thanks BigFloyd, if it helps a few people out then it's a success. I have some yeast related reading to do after my family gets settled into the house we are moving into. I'll probably have some edits to make after that. Hopefully not too many complete retractions

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Old 12-31-2013, 02:39 AM   #17
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Can I use a safale 04 yeast in a cream ale

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Old 12-31-2013, 03:30 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaug View Post
Can I use a safale 04 yeast in a cream ale
While the 04 would technically work to make beer, I would probably steer you more towards Safale US-05 for a cream ale. 05 tends to be a cleaner tasting yeast, while 04 will typically have more malt flavors and esters in the finish. 04 is great for English ales.
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:14 AM   #19
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Thanks it's the only one I have right now only gave time to brew tomorrow I have an 05 but it's three years old

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Old 01-13-2014, 04:18 PM   #20
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Thanks boydster, great write up

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Home Brew mobile app

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