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Old 03-12-2010, 02:31 AM   #1
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Default Double and Triple Fermentation

Hi

Lot of strong beers are said to be double fermentation or triple fermentation. What does it mean in the process of fermentation ? I know it has nothing to do with secondary fermentation, so how do you proceed ?

Many thanks

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Old 03-12-2010, 02:41 AM   #2
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Depending upon what you are looking at, can you put those terms in context for us? Double and triple fermentation can indeed mean secondary and tertiary fermentation, meaning the beer goes into 2 or 3 vessels to complete fermentation. Typically fermentation is pretty much complete in the primary and the secondary is used for clarifying or adding 'extra' ingredients from wood chips to fruit(s) and you name it.. vanilla even Then tertiary and even quaternary for some beers.

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Old 03-12-2010, 02:47 AM   #3
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Typically triple fermentation refers to adding some fermentable (corn sugar or?) after primary fermentation, then after that is fermented out, it is primed in bottles. So, it would be logical that double fermentation simply refers to bottle conditioned (primed) beer.

Theoretically one could keep adding sugar until the yeast strain is uncapable of fermentation further or until it floccs out, also one could add a higher tollerance yeast after that. You would probably end up with a very dry beer unless it was planned for from the beginning.

Unless of course you speaking of Belgian Trippel (Triple) fermentation which simply means it is appx. three times higher alcohol than a regular belgian, usually utilizing the basic primary/secondary fermentation schedules.

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Old 03-12-2010, 02:48 AM   #4
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Ok, let me explain then. I have a "Fin du monde" in front of me. It said "triple fermentation" and this is a 9 degree alcool beer. You never see on a beer double or triple fermentation when this beer is 5-6 degrees, only on strong beer. Is this a process to make the beer stronger ?

I like strong beer, and from now, I only managed to have 7 degree. How do I get 8 to 10 ? Is this by a special fermenation ?

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Old 03-12-2010, 02:55 AM   #5
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/triple-fermentation-99396/

Quick google search dug this up.

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Originally Posted by PereFecto View Post
I like strong beer, and from now, I only managed to have 7 degree. How do I get 8 to 10 ? Is this by a special fermenation ?
You need to add more fermentables and make sure your yeast can handle the ABV. If you like this beer specifically, look for Belgian Tripel recipes to get you in the neighborhood. Otherwise IIPAs, barleywines, and Russian Imperial Stouts are all styles that will get you there too.
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Old 03-12-2010, 03:02 AM   #6
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yes, I saw this thread, pretty interesting since it talk about beers brew in my region ( I'm from Montreal, Quebec)

So basicaly, a double or triple fermented beer is only a way for marketing to say " we have put the beer into a secondary fermenter and added sugar again". Adding corn sugar into the brewpot once the first fermentation seem over is the good way to make it to 8 and 9 degree ?

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Old 03-12-2010, 03:27 AM   #7
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It can mean different yeasts are used to ferment the beer. A lot of times belgian breweries will ferment with one strain of yeast, filter it out, then repitch a bottling yeast that attenuates better and bottle it in bombers with corks and cages.

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Old 03-12-2010, 10:44 AM   #8
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I have a IPA bottled that is 8.25% and that is just from having a everyday starting gravity of 1.075 and finishing low. So you can easily get 8+ by just increasing the base grain. For extract brewers just adding more #'s of extract.

BTW, along these lines and I'm sure experienced brewers already know, if you want to increase alcohol add more base grain and keep the spec. grains the same. I've done this successfully after hearing John Palmer discuss it and how increasing crystal proportionately with the base grain is a common mistake when going for a stronger beer. Scott 60/70/80/90 are good examples of this methodology.

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Old 03-12-2010, 10:50 AM   #9
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Here is the official write up, so now we can debate on what they mean by 'triple'... it even says one in the bottle so I'm imagining this beer is 1. primary, 2. secondary, and 3. bottle ... As far as adding more yeast later in the fermentation I am not familiar with this personally (but I don't know much) but I'm not sure this means that more yeast were added, it seems they just filter into a brightening tank (secondary) and then bottle prime. But it does say champagne and that could mean very 'dry' so maybe they do add more yeast - I'm sure others will know. Anyhow:



Since1994
TypeTriple fermentation Golden Ale, refermented in the bottle
Alcohol9 % alc./vol.
ColorBlond with a golden hue
TasteSmooth, slightly tart with the balanced flavors of wild spices, malt and hops
AromaWild spices
Shelf Life8 years or more
Serving SuggestionsGourmet dishes, fine cheeses and desserts

In February 1994, after 18 months of research, Unibroue launched La Fin du Monde (the end of the world). It is a 9 percent alcohol, triple fermentation beer. This type of beer was originally developed by the monks of the Middle Ages to be served on special occasions. La Fin du Monde is a deluxe beer made by triple fermentation and a unique way of straining the yeast. This method produces an unexpectedly subtle flavour. With its champagne-like effervescence, it has a vigourous presence in the mouth, which accentuates its strong personality. Slightly tart, with the balanced flavours of wild spices, malt and hops, it belongs to the class of great Trappist beers and, in this regard, is a North American first. At meals, it can replace white or red wines and enhances the flavour of most dishes. This beer is brewed to honour of the great explorers, who believed they had reached the end of the world when they discovered America.

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Last edited by Netflyer; 03-12-2010 at 10:53 AM. Reason: formatting
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