Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Do you shake it?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-13-2011, 09:21 AM   #1
Kugster
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Kugster's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chandler, AZ
Posts: 285
Default Do you shake it?

Just out of curiosity...

How many of you shake your fermenter during fermentation? I know I shake my starters, why not the batch? If you do, do you notice any diff. in attenuation? Can it make that more of a difference? Can you harm the yeast...I wouldn't think so but may be wrong.

Brewed a 1.063 last night using yeast 1332...wanna see how it is...been using safeale 05 for a while and had to change up, plus my LHBS doesn't carry WL's...anyways, fermentation is going real good at 24hrs...

this is when the question of shaking came to mind...just your thoughts...

Cheers

__________________

Drinking..........Beer
Primary 1
Primary 2
Secondary 1....Blackeye IIPA
Secondary 2........Mikita's BB Wheat
Conditioning.....
Tap 1.............Spooky's Stout
Tap 2.............Rico's Red

DogBone Brewery

If you get confused listen to the music play! - Robert Hunter

Kugster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 09:40 AM   #2
MBasile
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Sunnyvale, CA (NorCal)
Posts: 1,511
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Shaking introduces oxygen to the wort, which IIRC is used most during the yeast's reproduction phase. Therefore shaking after the main fermentation has begun (after reproduction) will just lead to an oxidized flavor in the beer.

If fermentation stalls, swirling the beer is a last resort to get the yeast in suspension and fermenting sugars again. However, that is only of mash temps, yeast pitching rates, and other factors point to a lower expected SG.

__________________

Up next: beer
Fermenting: beer
Conditioning: and more beer

Total gallons in 2012: 10

MBasile is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 11:55 AM   #3
EO74
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
EO74's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: rockland mass
Posts: 312
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

If fermentation has been going for a while the head space should be full of co2 not oxegen so i tend to think it shouldnt matter,that being said i try not to shake mine.Sometimes i have to move mine to differant spots in my house to keep temps right and they get shaken up quit a bit going up or down stairs and theyve tasted ok to me??

__________________
EO74 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 01:12 PM   #4
breez7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: NE OH
Posts: 312
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Dont shake it! The only reason you do for a starter is to introduce more Oxygen. Actively fermenting yeast churns the beer for you, let them do the work without the risk of oxidizing your beer.

Pitch the yeast, come back 2-3 weeks later.

__________________
www.brewersnotepad.blogspot.com
breez7 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 01:27 PM   #5
Ridonkulous05
Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Dayton, Ohio
Posts: 70
Likes Given: 3

Default

I confess, I am a primary swirler...

I do a lot of Ales with WLP002, and it flocculates so fast and well that I tend to swirl it back into suspension within the first three days (gently enough to slightly drive off a bit of CO2, but not so significantly disturb my CO2 layer or spill a full airlock)... The placebo effect in my mind is that I get a point or two better attenuation with this yeast than with a simple "pitch and forget" technique.

OCD and unnecessary, I admit. I will proudly say, though, that I am not tempted to do this with hefeweizens or other yeast strains.

-Just airing my dirty laundry on this thread, I guess-

...All this will change when I finally switch to a conical, where I will be less likely to see the process, and it will be more easy to pull a SG sample (to help distill my voodoo attenuation theories)... Until then, though, I will probably rouse the "lazy" WLP002.

__________________
Ridonkulous05 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 01:40 PM   #6
kanzimonson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 1,985
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EO74 View Post
If fermentation has been going for a while the head space should be full of co2 not oxegen so i tend to think it shouldnt matter,that being said i try not to shake mine.Sometimes i have to move mine to differant spots in my house to keep temps right and they get shaken up quit a bit going up or down stairs and theyve tasted ok to me??
I've been making an argument against the concept of a CO2 blanket recently. If you think about it, air has CO2 in it - and lots of other gases too. Yes, CO2 is heavier than air, but there's always going to be some mixing.

CO2 and air are not like oil and water. Oil and water are cohesive molecules that stick to themselves, and they are also extremely repellent of each other. Not the same with CO2 and the various mixes of gases in air.

So I'm sure that fermentation at least helps shift the gas mixture in the carboy's headspace towards CO2, I'd be surprised if you could truly push out all the air.
__________________
kanzimonson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 02:05 PM   #7
motobrewer
I'm no atheist scientist, but...
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Thiensville, Wisconsin
Posts: 6,613
Liked 208 Times on 183 Posts
Likes Given: 368

Default

air is .039% CO2.

when beer ferments it produces CO2, which forces whatever else is in the headspace (air) out of the airlock. it keeps purging as it keeps producing.

__________________
motobrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 02:08 PM   #8
kanzimonson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 1,985
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts

Default

Compare pouring dense wort into water - yes, it sinks to the bottom, but there's also some mixing.

Do you really think that your headspace is 100% CO2 at the end of fermentation?

__________________
kanzimonson is offline
Revvy Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 02:29 PM   #9
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2724 Times on 1632 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by EO74 View Post
If fermentation has been going for a while the head space should be full of co2 not oxegen so i tend to think it shouldnt matter,that being said i try not to shake mine.Sometimes i have to move mine to differant spots in my house to keep temps right and they get shaken up quit a bit going up or down stairs and theyve tasted ok to me??
But if you mess with your fermenter in anyway like to open it up to take a reading or something, you've violated the integrity of the co2 space, so I wouldn't trust that all you've got is co2 in there. If you got some o2 in there, you're much closer to having liquid cardboard than someone who DOESN'T vshake is. So to me shaking it is not worth the risk, and pretty idiotic. Most people who do it are trying to make their stupid airlock bubble...it's really not helping anything.

In fact if your krausen is there, you could be knocking it down, so it doesn't have the opportunity to actually fall through in the normal course of things, and act as a filter to pull stuff down with it as it goes. So you could be losing some nice conditioning tools.

Like other's have said, intitially we shake things to introduce o2 so other than that, there's no practical reason for doing it, so why bother? Give you wort plenty of oxygen before you pitch the yeast and then them do their job.

I believe in the pitch the yeast and come back in a month method of brewing. The yeast knows how to do things, they've been brewing beer since before we were a drip running down momma's leg, so get the heck out of their way and let them do their jobs.

Seriously, what benefits do you think you're getting from doing it, besides it makes the airlock bubble and it makes you feel like you're in charge of things, when in reality the yeast are and they don't need any help from you?
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-13-2011, 02:32 PM   #10
kanzimonson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Charlottesville, VA
Posts: 1,985
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
a drip running down momma's leg
that's hideous!

and i love it
__________________
kanzimonson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need to shake my fermentor? answer is... Zamial Fermentation & Yeast 12 12-14-2010 04:39 PM
gonna age, when to shake? jimmythefoot Fermentation & Yeast 15 11-18-2010 07:01 PM
Shake/Swirl Fermentor?? hbhudy Fermentation & Yeast 2 04-13-2010 09:15 PM
Forgot to shake the smack pack before smacking BeerFun Fermentation & Yeast 8 10-26-2009 06:03 AM