The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Did I insult my Wyeast 1214?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-23-2009, 05:22 PM   #1
Judochop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 305
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Did I insult my Wyeast 1214?

Ok, so I brewed a Belgian Dubbel this past Sunday. I used a 1L starter (w/ stir plate) to get my Wyeast 1214 going. And it was going good. From Sunday afternoon through Tuesday night, I had the primary in my guestroom and it was chugging along @ 76-78 degrees per the tape thermometer on the side of the carboy.

I thought to myself (first mistake), “Perhaps that is too warm? Perhaps I am getting more esters than I’d care for? I don’t want it to turn solvent-like. Perhaps I should move it down to the basement, under the stairs, where it can cool down 4-5 degrees?”

So, late Tuesday night I listened to myself (second mistake) and agreed with myself (final mistake) and moved her from the guestroom to the dark, cool space under the basement stairs.

This morning (Wednesday), what was a vigorous ferment the night before is now sitting like a couch potato @ 72 degrees. No activity in the airlock, and that thick, nasty top-fermenting cake is a mere shadow of its former self.

Can this be coincidence? Was she due to stop after two days anyway? Or did I insult my 1214?

I’ve heard that the Belgians in general can be finicky about temp and that if you try to mess with them, they can crash on you. (Why I didn’t listen to that voice instead, only Heaven knows.) But I don’t know if that caution applies to ALL Belgian yeasts, or just particular ones.

Any advice from those who know this particular strain?
Should I move her back upstairs?
Should I swirl?
Should I pitch more yeast? If so, can I go with a clean dry yeast, or should I stick with 1214?
Should I wait?

__________________
Judochop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 05:23 PM   #2
SporkD2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Posts: 748
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I'd give it a few days and I bet you see activity again

__________________
SporkD2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 05:33 PM   #3
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,205
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 466

Default

I think that at that initial temp, you got the bulk of fermentation over with very quickly. My experience with 1214 is that above about 65F, it's a banana bomb.

__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 06:11 PM   #4
lowlife
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 688
Liked 11 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny View Post
I think that at that initial temp, you got the bulk of fermentation over with very quickly. My experience with 1214 is that above about 65F, it's a banana bomb.
My experience dictates the same. I have used it 4 times. Id ferment as cool as possible. Fermented above 70 it was way too many esters for my liking. Your tastes may be different. I couldn't drink it though. I aged it 9 months and it still tasted too estery for me. It would ferment very fast at those temps, take a reading and see.
__________________

Last edited by lowlife; 09-23-2009 at 06:14 PM.
lowlife is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 06:19 PM   #5
Judochop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 305
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

A geniune "thanks" for responding, and a sarcastic "thanks" for some potential bad news.

I'm a bit confused though, because Wyeast labs gives it a comfort range of 68-78 degrees. Why would they say that if it results in putrid beer?

I recognize there may be a natural discrepancy due to personal tastes, but putrid is putrid. I would assume somebody using a Belgian Abbey yeast strain is intending to target a Belgian Abbey flavored beer because they like that taste, and I would also assume that Wyeast would provide a temp range that results in that same level of ester/flavor profile.

__________________
Judochop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 06:30 PM   #6
lowlife
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 688
Liked 11 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 33

Default

1214 is crazy at high temps. My first time I used I thought the same. Hey I like bananna flavor, the directions say ferment high for bananna...so.. It was too much for me. Take a hydo reading, hopefully it turns out ok. My neighbors couldnt taste bannana and drank it. I couldnt handle it personally.

__________________
lowlife is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 06:35 PM   #7
Judochop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 305
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Ok, so now I'm thinking maybe I was right to get it down to 72 degrees. But I'm still in the predicament of a (possibly) stuck fermentation.

I'll take a reading tonight and wait it out to next week before I take another to see if there's any progress. However, if I find that I am truly 'stuck', would what folks recommend?

Should I up the temp and swirl to wake up the yeast?
Should I pitch more yeast? If so, can I go with a clean dry yeast, or should I stick with 1214?

__________________
Judochop is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 07:26 PM   #8
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,205
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 466

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judochop View Post
I'm a bit confused though, because Wyeast labs gives it a comfort range of 68-78 degrees. Why would they say that if it results in putrid beer?

I recognize there may be a natural discrepancy due to personal tastes, but putrid is putrid. I would assume somebody using a Belgian Abbey yeast strain is intending to target a Belgian Abbey flavored beer because they like that taste, and I would also assume that Wyeast would provide a temp range that results in that same level of ester/flavor profile.
In general, both Wyeast and White give temp recommendations that are way higher than most people find good. I feel that a lot of their recommendations are based more on getting good yeast performance than good beer flavor. And I say that in spite of my relationship with Wyeast.
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 07:28 PM   #9
Denny
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eugene OR
Posts: 4,205
Liked 412 Times on 313 Posts
Likes Given: 466

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judochop View Post
Ok, so now I'm thinking maybe I was right to get it down to 72 degrees. But I'm still in the predicament of a (possibly) stuck fermentation.

I'll take a reading tonight and wait it out to next week before I take another to see if there's any progress. However, if I find that I am truly 'stuck', would what folks recommend?

Should I up the temp and swirl to wake up the yeast?
Should I pitch more yeast? If so, can I go with a clean dry yeast, or should I stick with 1214?
Don't assume you have a stuck fermentation until you take a gravity reading. A 1L starter is on the small side so it may take a while to ferment out. It's been less than a week, so I really think you're jumping the gun.
__________________

Life begins at 60....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

http://www.experimentalbrew.com - the website for the book "Experimental Homebrewing"...coming Nov. 2014

Denny is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-23-2009, 07:38 PM   #10
Judochop
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Libertyville, IL
Posts: 305
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Okeedokee. I'll give it a couple weeks and will report back if there's been no progress.

I'm concerned that I shocked my yeast into permanent hibernation only because I've read that Belgian yeasts tend to react that way to sudden cooler temps. If this was an English strain, I'd not have even mentioned it.

Thanks.

__________________
Judochop is offline
dogbar Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wYeast 1214 and Chimay mdf191 Recipes/Ingredients 15 11-03-2012 09:42 PM
Wyeast 1214 slow to swell cyclonebeer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 01-23-2011 08:34 AM
Wyeast 1214 shlauncha Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 04-19-2009 02:33 PM
How slow is Wyeast 1214? EeryBug Recipes/Ingredients 4 01-06-2009 07:50 PM
Wyeast 1214 jeff Recipes/Ingredients 3 06-15-2007 02:33 PM